FP-1942JA-Feb

Events vs Time Feb 1942

Feb. 10: Japanese troops enter Singapore after repairing causeway. Defense blunder now apparent all defenses concentrated on seaward end of island, leaving landward side exposed to enemy assault.

Feb. 15: General Tomoyuki Yamashita receives the surrender of Singapore from British General Arthur E. Percival. Australian 8th Division interned.

Feb. 18: Australian troops arrive Java.

Feb. 19: Australian and Dutch forces resist Japanese landings on Timor, but island taken following day. Japanese aircraft bomb Darwin, major naval and supply base for Allied forces. 238 dead and 224 injured, along with serious losses to Australian and U. S. shipping.

Feb. 27: Battle of Java Sea results in loss of Allied fleet of cruisers and destroyers.

Feb. 28: Japanese land on Java.

JA-FEB

The Enemy was Closing In – what were Bases are now Targets

image004

Singosari Fld at Malang, Soerabaja= Surabaya  Jogja = Jogjakarta

Feb 1, 1942  6 planes from the 7th & 4 from 19th Group took off to attack enemy shipping in Balikpapan area at 0650. Mission abandoned due to weather. Returned Malang at 1215. Northcutt returned at 1140 with engine trouble.

No 40-3074

No 41-2427

No 41-2456

No 41-2458

No 41-2469

No 41-2472

Lt Adams

Lt Northcutt

Maj Straubel

Lt Cox

Lt Swanson

Lt Green

            Lt Rankin and Smith leave for Jogja in K-131 at 0955.

            Capt Broadhurst in from Bandoeng in B-18 No 36-338 at 1255. Lt Basye in B-17E No 41-2461 off for Jogja at 1445.

MF1  3 LB-30s take off from Jogja at 2245, 2300, and 2315 to attack enemy ships. Lt Dougherty, Lt Kelsay, and Lt Tarter pilots.

Feb 2, 1942:  MF1r  Three LB-30s landed at Jogja at 0800, 0805 and 0900. Lt Dougherty’s plane bombed and sank an enemy ship.

B-18 off for Bandoeng at 0900. P-Maj Straubel, CP-Lt R.M. Smith, E&R Sgt Pickett.

            MF2 Eight B-17s of the 19th Group took off at 0930 to bomb warships & transports.

No 41-2453

No 41-2455

No 41-2456

No 41-2466

No 41-2458

No 41-2469

No 41-2470

No 41-2472

Lt Connally

Lt Mathewson

Lt Sargent

Lt Hillhouse

Lt Key A.E.

Lt Schmitt

Lt Casper

Lt Key F.M.

            B24A No 40-2373 to Bandoeng at 1210. Lt Hillhouse in B-17E No 41-2466 returned from mission at 1325, faulty guns. At 1330 B-17E No 41-2460, Lt Boes pilot, took off Bandoeng for depot repair.

            At 1450 Lt Michie arrived from Bandoeng in K-103 (courier plane).

MF2r:  Seven B-17Es returned from mission at 1620. One ship sunk and another hit. No enemy pursuit.

            At 1800 LB-30 No AL-609 arrived from Jogja. Lt Wade, pilot. He took off again for a reconnaissance of Ambon by moonlight at 2020, landing to be made at Darwin.

Feb 3 1942:  Lt Teborek in K-101 (courier plane) off for Bandoeng at 0810.

            MF3  Nine B-17s of the 7th Group off at 0905 to bomb enemy ships.

No 41-2453

No 41-2455

No 41-2456

No 41-2458

No 41-2464

No 41-2469

No 41-2471

No 41-2472

No 41-2483

Lt Preston

Lt Habberstat

Lt Dufrane

Lt Sargent

Lt Bleasdale

Lt Swanson

Lt Strother

Lt Hobson

Lt Northcutt

            LB-30 No AL-533, Lt Crowder in from Jogja at 0915. Off for Darwin at 1005.

            Air raid alarm sounded at 1015. Enemy aircraft sighted above field at 1040 (about 9 enemy “Dive Bombers 97” with belly tanks painted light grey with red ball insignia. Ground strafing attack began at 1045. Fires seen on field at 1055. High altitude attack by horizontal bombers at 1100 (about 20 airplanes at about 15,000 feet - type undetermined - attack weak). One B-17 with bomb load exploded at 1105. Another at 1110. Horizontal bombers flew back and dropped a few more bombs at 1115. In the meantime frequent diving attacks were made by the dive bombers. All Clear 1130.

            Lt Cox in B-17C No 40-2062 took off for a local test flight at 0930. Still unreported at midnight.

            MF3r  Six planes returned from bombing mission at 0345. Lts Dufrane and Stother landed at Surabaya. Results of bombing -- undetermined due to weather. Lt Swanson had No 1 engine catch fire. Five men bailed out and ship was landed wheels up on sandy beach on Arenda Is. (5deg 05min S 114deg 40min E). Pfc A.J.Loway died of “oxygen want” in No 41-2464. In No 41-2472 Pfc Wood and Pfc Demott were wounded. One enemy fighter believed shot down.

            LB-30 No AL-570 in at 1445 from Jogja. Lt Ezzard - Pilot.

Maj Straubel and Lt R.M.Smith both badly burned when shot down in B-18 No 36-338 near Surabaya. In C.B.Z. hospital. A Major Birch 0-665971 (?) in same ship died at hospital. No word of any other passengers at midnight.

Operations Diary disrupted

Feb 4-20 1942  2 LB-30 via Pacific & 3  B-17E via Africa Arrive

Ar 02-04-42 Pac

Ar 02-05-42 Afr

Ar 02-05-42 Pac

Ar 02-06-42 Afr

Ar 02-20-42 Aft

LB-30 No AL-567

B-17E  41-2492

LB-30 AL-515

B-17E  41-2488

B-17E No 41-2507

1Lt Cool Paul E.

1Lt Pritchard W J.

1Lt Helton Elbert

1Lt Bridges J D.

1Lt Willimams Robert L.

2Lt Parkinson T E.

2Lt Kendall Jr D E.

1Lt Fletcher A A.

2Lt Woods M C.

2Lt De Shaze Ar D.

2Lt Travis Euel A.

A/C Sampeck A J.

2Lt Rogers R S.

2Lt Balzanellli J

2Lt Wilks Rayburn A.

Sgt Truella John

Pfc Kleir H J.

A/C Appleton N R.

Sgt Nock G M.

Sgt Craig Dennis

S/Sgt Sexton Jack

S/Sgt Black D E.

S/Sgt Wilcox C B.

S/Sgt Sage W I.

Pfc Knight Forrest L.

S/Sgt Bone S P.

Pfc Schroder L J.

Sgt Thornell J B.

S/Sgt Smith J J.

Pvt Dietz Edward R.

Sgt Noller R R.

Pvt Charnesky H.

Sgt Fowler R R.

Sgt Chytil L A.

Pvt Stewart T J.

Pfc Leverly J R.

Pvt Wilhelm C F.

Pvt Johnson L A.

S/Sgt Kennedy R.

Pvt Wingard J O.

Cap Gottlieb J.D.

Pvt Osborne E G.

Lt Gibson W.J.

Prichard Fletcher Arthur Helton

Operations Diary Continued

Feb 4, 1942:   S-3 office moved from flying field -- Singosari field to the town of Malang this morning.

            An air raid alarm sounded at Singosari and one LB-30 and (5) B-17Es were flown off the ground to avoid strafing. Two returned to Malang. One landed at Madioen (later returned to Malang) and the others went to Jogja.

            Lts Strother and Dufane went from Surabaya to Jogja in their B-17Es.

            ARF3 in the air raid of Feb 3 were: B-17D No 40-3074, B-17D No 40-3078, and B-17E No 41-2470 burned to the ground due to action of enemy straffer. B-17E No 41-2427 which burned partially yesterday burst into flame this morning (cause unknown) and burned to the ground. Dutch Koolhoven No K-103 which was being used as a courier plane was shot through the main spar and rendered unfit to fly without depot repair. No casualties or injuries at the field.

            Cox & crew all died in crash of B-17C No 40-2062, which was shot down and burned about ten miles south of Malang

1st Lt

Cox Ray L.

0-380226

1st Lt

Huse John E.L.

0-21777

S/Sgt

Sowa John W.

6541524

Sgt

Karlinger Arthur E.

6579249

Sgt

Penney John S.

17023807

Pvt

Binghan Jack E.

20813175

131st F.A.

Pvt

Barnes Don H.

20813583

131st F.A.

            The airplane was attacked by Japanese pursuit at the same time the field at Malang was being raided.

Straubel

Straubel & passengers of B-18 No 36-338 which was shot down west of Surabaya by Japanese fighters all died in crash or in hospital.

Maj

Straubel Austin A.

0-17869

Maj

Burch Joseph A.

unk

2nd Lt

Smith Russel M.

0-417113

1st Lt

Boes Glenn H.

0-392741

2nd Lt

Kriel Erwin R.

0-398626

L/Col

Murphy

unk

S/Sgt

Pickett George V.

6550216

Feb 5, 1942:  MF5  Nine crews prepared for an early missions. Four of the planes to be used were to come from Jogja and be serviced here. Two of the planes were stuck in the mud and failed to take off. Two arrived Malang at 0800. No. 2472  and No. 2456 had engine trouble and failed to join the flight. The flight departed Malang at 0930.  Six B-17Es of the 19th Group took off to bomb ships at 0930.

No 41-2453

No 41-2455

No 41-2458

No 41-2464

No 41-2471

No 41-2483

Lt McKinsey

Lt Bohnaker

Capt Schwanbeck

Lt Tash

Lt Hillhouse

Lt Green

            An air raid alarm sounded at Singosari at 0950. B-17E No 41-2456 – Reyes, Pilot and B-17E No 41-2472 Capt Parsel, Pilot, who were standing by took off within 5 minutes of the alarm. The “all clear” signal sounded at 1240.

            No 41-2492 brought Lt W.J. Gibson from Batavia. He came to Batavia by airline from Palembang where he had been salvaging parts from B-17E No 41-2419.

MF5r  Six planes No. 2458, 2453, 2471, 2455, 2464 and 2483 departed Malang at 0930 to attack warships in Balikpapan area. Air raid alarm was sounded for Surabaya just after take-off. The flight was called on the radio and told to proceed with caution. At 1020 the flight had assembled and reached a point 40 miles east of Surabaya, and just south of Madoera Island when they encountered eight "Zero” fighters. Six of the fighters made head on attacks and then numerous other attacks from the front and side. The tail gunner in No. 2464 is believed to have shot one down as it was on fire and falling. It was not seen to hit the water as it was necessary to concentrate on the other planes. One other plane was hit and damaged by a gunner in No, 2483. Enemy fighters seem to have changed their tactics from tail to frontal and side attacks. The flight failed to proceed on the mission due to the fact that the oxygen system No. 2483 had been hit and two top turrets were out of commission. The flight was instructed by radio to proceed to the south coast and stay in the air until 1500 to avoid the danger of having the planes caught on the ground. All planes landed at 1520 with bombs.

            MF5r (second report) The flight of six B-17s which took off earlier returned at 1530. They had been attacked by eight “zero” fighters at 4000 ft off the south coast of Madoera. Two of the upper turrets failed to operate and one plane’s (No 41-2483) oxygen system was shot up so the mission was abandoned. One fighter was shot down and another damaged. Head-on, quartering frontal, and side attacks from the rear.

            The two B-17E’s which took off when the raid alarm sounded also returned to Malang in the late afternoon.  B-17E No 41-2466, Lt Preston, pilot, arrived Malang from Jogja.

            ARF5  Air raid alarms delayed work today. The Alarm sounded at 0950 and the all clear at 1230. During this time a P-40 landed to get directions to Surabaya. He had been in a fight and lost his way. A new B-17E and a new LB-30 landed during the alarm. Lts. Pritchard and Helton were the pilots. Another Alarm sounded at 1500 when our planes were approaching. The "All Clear” came ten minutes later.

            B-17E No. 2466. Lt. Preston landed from Jogja at 1730.

Lt Swanson and crew of B-17E No 41-2469 were picked up by Navy PBY and brought to Surabaya. Cpl Adamczyk had an injured leg and was left at the hospital. The remainder of the crew returned to Malang.

At 1506 Lt Crimmins returned from Arosbaja. (Swanson’s) Plane had been landed on beach. Built wooden runway and flew ship off.

Feb 6, 1942:  Lt Hilton and crew of LB-30 No AL-515 left Malang for Jogja at 0820.

            Nine B-17E’s took off from Singosari at 0920 when an enemy bombing force was reported over Madoera. They returned at 1530 after cruising over the sea south of Java and about 100 mi west of Malang.  At 1610 B-17E No 41-2483 arrived from Bandoeng via Jogja.  At 1615 B-24A No 40-2373 arrived from Bandoeng with Col Eubank and Maj Combs aboard. K-101 Lt Jacquet, pilot, arrived from Bandoeng at 1230.

ARF6   Nine planes No 2456-DuFrane, 2483-Linsay, 2455-Habberstad , 2460 Bleasedale, 2453-Rouse, 2458-Casper, 2471-Northcutt, 2466-Preston, and 2492-Pritchard of the 7th Group took stations at 6:00 ready for take-off upon sounding of air raid alarm. No. 2472 was placed in revetment and camouflaged. The nine planes listed above took off at 0910 for evacuation of Airdrome. Landed at 1520.

            Lt. Baxter was assigned to Bandoeng to assist Lt. Col. Walsh. Lt Mosely is assigned as Armament

            The following men have qualified as aerial gunners from the 131 Field Artillery:

Battery

Battery

Fraser

William G.

Pvt

20815917

D

Jones

S.J.

D

Williams

Glenn A.

Pvt

20813805

D

Reynolds

N.T..

D

Connolly

James K.

Pvt

20813591

F

Connally

Adrion

D

Hale

Alton B Jr

Pvt

208113137

2 BTN Hq

Lyday

Ray C.

Hernandez

Hilario L.

Pvt

38026066

2 BTN Hq

Bills

Billy

Baldwin

Ray G.

Pvt

20813419

E

West

Bryson C.

B-17E No. 41-2488 with the following crew was assigned to the 19th Group this date:  Bridges J D, Woods M C, Balzanelli J, Nock G M, Chytil L A, Johnson J H, Smith J F, Wingard J O

Feb 7, 1942:  MF7  Eight B-17’s of the 19th Group took off at 0520 for a reconnaissance bombing mission. Objective was a carrier reported southeast of Makassar.

No 41-2453

No 41-2455

No 41-2458

No 41-2464

No 41-2471

No 41-2483

No 41-2488

No 41-2492

Lt Tash

Mathewson

Capt Key A.E.

Capt Key F.M.

Lt Bohnaker

Maj Combs

Lt Hillhouse

Lt McKinzie

            B-24A took off for Bandoeng.  K101 off for Bandoeng at 0830.

            MF4br Lt Wade and Crowder in from Darwin in LB-30s No AL:-609 and AL-535. They had flown to Del Monte on Feb 4 taking off from Darwin at 0345 GCT. They returned to Darwin with 19th Group personnel. Wade landed Darwin at 0115 GCT and Crowder at 0245 GCT Feb 5. They landed at Malang at 1605 and took off for Jogja at 1700. They brought the following 21 officers and men with them:

Capt

Horrigan W.C.

0-20678

1st Lt

Brown Elmore G.

0-22057

1st Lt

Maddux Jr Sam

0-21589

1st Lt

Smith John H.M.

0-318448

1st Lt

Walker Jr Frederick W.

0-341110

2nd Lt

Bean Joe M.

0-426865

2nd Lt

Wasson Robert F.

0-426866

2nd Lt

Meyer Robert R. Jr

0-416325

2nd Lt

Holdridge Curtis J

0-417633

2nd Lt

Heold Edgar H.

0-425405

M/Sgt

Blair Madison B.

6553864

M/Sgt

Etheridge Heber E

6324997

M/Sgt

Wupperfeld John A. 

R-1006838

M/Sgt

Stewart James E.

6540410

M/Sgt

Kilgore Roy

6222346

M/Sgt

Kelly Robert J.

R-544378

T/Sgt

Scott Geroge W.

6561212

T/Sgt

Kelsey Alex

6693386

T/Sgt

Carleson Lewis H.

6802201

S/Sgt

Ranaldi Patsy

6076539

S/Sgt

Benham Frank A. 

6247415

 

Lt. Greene and Capt. Teats arrived from Darwin in one of the LB-308s. also.

             The following officers arrived Sourabaya by U.S. Navy submarine from Corrigidor on February 7 and proceeded to Malang the same day:

             Capt. Morris H. Shedd                                                       0‑21498

             Capt. Dean G. Hoevot                                                        0‑22246

             1st Lt. John W. Carpenter III                                          0‑21790

             1st Lt. Harl Pease Jr.                                                         0‑396206

1st Lt. Warner W. Croxton Jr. who arrived at the same time came to Malang on Feb. 9. His ser. No. 0‑21957

             LB‑30 No, AL‑515t Lt. Kelsay, pilot, landed at Malang at 1730  in from Jogia.

B‑24 A No. 40‑2370 arrived from Bandoeng at 1800. Pilot – Capt. Davis.

MF7r The planes which took off at 0520 landed Malang at 1500 They patrolled an area bounded by 6o 30’ S 120o 26’ E, 7o S 121o 30’E, 6o 20’S 121o 30’ E.  Poor visibility and overcast in the target area caused th mission to return after searching the area for 45 minutes.  Two planes had previously left the formation – one because of turret trouble and one because of low oil pressure. Result of mission -- negative.

MF7r (second version) Course reconnaissance was then made from 6deg 30’ S 120deg 30’ E to Batahi strait, along Soembawa coast thru Alas Strait to 150 miles south of the coast, then parallel to coast of Java. No surface vessels of any type were sighted during the entire reconnaissance. One unidentified airplane was observed north Madoera Island at 6:15 L.C.T. believed to be PBY. The flight landed Malang at 15:00 L.C.T.

            Weather take off was broken clouds, 5000'. Weather enroute was overcast at 25,000’ with several lower layers of broken clouds at various altitudes down to 1000', weather on landing was broken clouds 1000' with thunderstorms all directions

            Airplane No. 2488 abandoned the mission at 7:00 am due to low oil pressure on #3 engine. The pilot was instructed to remain over coast south of Malang until 3:00 p.m. at which time he returned to Malang and landed.

Lt. Teats, Lt. Greene arrived Malang in LB-30 returned to duty.

Air raid observed.

            The following officers and men were evacuated from Del Monte and reported to the 19th Group for duty this date:

1st Lt. Maddux Sam JR. 0-21589

2nd Lt. Bean, J., Navigator

M/Sgt Sulftidge, D. R. 6077351

1st Lt. Smith, J. H. M., 0-318448

2nd Lt Meyer, R. R, 0-416325

M/Sgt Kilgore, Roy, 6222346

1st Lt. Holdridge, C. J., 0-417633

2nd Lt Wasson, Navigator

M/Sgt Kelly, R. J. R-455378

1st Lt. Heald, E. H., 0-425405

M/Sgt, Blair, M. B., 6553864

T/Sgt Kelsey, Alex, 6693386

1st Lt. Nanney, S. M., 0-425408

M/Sgt Wupperfeld, J. A. R-1006838

T/Sgt Carleson, L. H. 6802201

1st Lt. Brown, E. G., 0-22057

M/Sgt, Stewart, J. E., 6540410

S/Sgt Ranaldi, P. , 6076539

S/Sgt Benham, F. A. 6247415

Feb 8 1942:  MF8 At 0735 nine B‑17 of the 7th Group took off from Singosari to bomb the occupied airdrome at Kendari II. Pilots and planes:

41-2456

41-2458

41-2492

41-2471

41-2455

41-2483

41-2483

41-2453

41-2464

DuFrane

Swanson

Princhard

Strother

Preston

Lindsey

Habberstad

Northcutt

Bleasdals

 Swanson landed Pasirian. Strother landed Jogja. Lindsey, Northcut, Hahberstad, Bleasdale landed at Malang between twelve and one o’clock.

            Three new B-17's No. 41-2486 ( Beck ), 41-2489 ( Hartison) 41-2494 (Lorence ) arrived from Java at 1800 hours. Number 41-2494 overshot field could not stop on wet surface and “cracked up” beyond repair at end of runway.

            The airplane No. 41-2494 and following crew were assigned to the 19th Group.

P

Lorence

A.

2nd Lt

0-398751

E

Billen

T.L.

Cpl

12018062

CP

Prouty

R.J.

2nd Lt

0-430616

R

Cipriani

E.R.

Cpl

13012501

N

Worle

R. I.

2nd Lt

G

Gwinn

F. H.

Pfc

15058738

B

Walberg

D. E.

Pfc

16009443

G

Crabtree

Pfc

37009758

            B-17D No 3066, Schaetzel, arrived from Darwin at 1800 hrs. The following 19th Group personnel returned to duty: Schaetzel, Work, Keiser, Vandevanter, Cottage, Baca, Byers, Hanna

Davis  B‑24 A off for Darwin at 0035,

Connally (not of l9th) in Beechcraft in at 0630. Left Beechcraft  here for use of Col. Eubank and went to Darwin with Lt, Kelsey who took off in LB‑30 No. AL‑515 at 0840.

MF8r  Bombay tanks and 7 100 kg. bombs wore carried. The flight was intercepted by enemy pursuit (9 to 12 planes typos "0” and "96") at 60” 45” S 116” E, at 0905 Java time. The altitude was 14,000’  The enemy made co‑ordinated attacks from the front, front quarter and front underneath simultaneously. On the enemy's second attack Capt, Du Frane's airplane was hit and a great mass of flames burst from the bombay. The airplane continued to burn after the bombay tank was dropped and six men were seen to bail out as the ship descended. The enemy fired at the men In parachutes. The airplane exploded in aid‑air. Capt. Strother took over the lead of the formation when Capt. Du Frane left.  On a subsequent attack (head‑on) Lt, Prichard’s airplane was hit caught fire, and exploded on the way down, One man boiled out of Lt, Prichard’s airplane, The remaining six planes in the formation (One had left the formation at 0845 duo to mechanical difficulties) finally reached cloud cover where heavy rains and turbulence made formation impossible. Return to base was made individually. In Lt, Habberstad’s plane Pfc. Homer D. Bilyen 6581616 was killed by enemy fire. Lt Lindsey's plane had its tail section shot up so bad that it took two men to hold the controls. when the plane hit the turbulent air It was Impossible to hold it on an even keel and it evidently spun. It was brought under control at 7000’. The navigator, copilot, and tail gunner all bailed out during the spin. Lt Lindsey, without the aid of a C0‑pilot, navigator, or a map, succeeded in righting his plans, finding his way home in unfavorable weather over strange territory,, and landing safely at Malang with one wounded man,, Pfc. J. R. Mackley, 6578531. Capt. Strother’s airplane was hit after he took the lead of the formation (another frontal attack). An explosion of a low pressure oxygen bottle blow out the hydraulic system and the bomb release mechanism in front of the bombay. Because an air raid alarm was in progress at Malang and because of the damaged condition of the plan, it was flown to Jogja and landed. Lt, Swanson landed at Pasirian because of bad weather at Malang and a low gas supply. No damage to airplane and crew all o.k. Capt. Preston's airplane was hit and a fire started in the bombay but he jettisoned both his bombs and bombay tank coincidentally with the hit, The tank was seen to be on fire as it fell free. Four of the five planes which landed at Malang were damaged by gunfire ‑ two of them seriously. Five enemy planes were shot down, two of them with the 30 cal. nose guns. The other three were shot down by the combined efforts of the top turrets, side guns, and tail guns. The bottom turrets were ineffective. No antiaircraft fire received, The planes landed from 1155 to 1615. Two unidentified surface craft were seen and reported to the Navy. Also a merchant vessel.

Remarks.

1.         It is almost certain that the two airplanes were lost as a result of bombay tanks being hit by explosive bullets. But for quick action, a third might have been lost for the same reason. The entire flight jettisoned their bombs and tanks,

2.         The enemy attack on the bombardment formation was the best executed attack so far encountered,

3.         Co‑ordinated attacks from head‑on and front quarters wore the first attacks Of this nature reported by friendly forces in this area, however, the flight which was attacked at 4000’ on Fob 5 was subjected to individual attacks from the front hemisphere.

4,         The relative speed between attacking pursuit and bombardment was so great that top turrets could not traverse fast enough to fire on the enemy during head on attacks. The 30 cal nose guns were the sole defense against this type of attack.

5.          In both cases where head‑on attacks were executed the bombardment formation was caught at a low altitude and climbing and the superior performance of pursuit enabled them to choose the avenue of attack. At altitudes in excess of 20,000’ the advantage is lessened to the extent that pursuit attacks have, to date, come from the side or rear and can be dealt with much more effectively.

7BG-p45DuFrane

MF8r (second report) The 7th Group lost two B-17Es with crews today, The pilots DuFrane and Pritchard. About ten men jumped from the two planes over the ocean - may possibly have reached Kanean Island. Three men jumped from Lindsey’s airplane - the airplane returned. The following was learned from this flight:  (1) Pilots and co-pilots need back type chutes.  (2) Jap fighters drop belly tanks before attack. (3) Enemy fighters have adopted a simultaneous: head on - above - head on below - right front quarter - left front quarter attack. (4) Bombay tanks are risky.

             At 1720 B‑17D No. 40‑3066 Capt. Schaetzel, pilot, arrived from Darwin, He brought the following from Del Monte

1Lt. Ray W. Mc Duffee

0‑2361884

2Lt  Staneill M. Nanney

0‑425408

M/Sgt. Dayton R. Selfridge

6077351

From Melbourne Depot: Capt. W. H. Smith, Capt. Keiser, Lt Vandevanter, Lt. Work, Lt. Cottage, Lt. Friedman, Lt. Hayman, S/Sgt. Baca, Sgt. Hanna, and Sgt. Byers.

3 B‑17E No. 41‑2494, No. 41‑24860 and No, 41‑2489, arrived from Jogja at 1730. No. 41‑2494 overshot on landing and damaged the airplane beyond repair.

Persons who bailed out Feb 8 & did not survive

Bailed our of 41-2483

Crew of 41-2492

Crew of 41-2456

CP

2Lt. Francis E. Smith

0‑430627

P

1Lt. William J. Prichard

0‑317864

P

Capt J DuFrane

0‑22810

N

A/C Marvin J. Schmella

19022168

N

2Lt. Isadore Alfred

Unknown

CP

1Lt. R Negley Jr.

0‑22108

G

Sgt. F. T. Lewis

6833881

CP

2Lt. W. T. Morgan

0‑362538

N

2Lt. S. Patillo

0‑412152

B

2Lt. F. 0. Lascombe

0‑398646

B

2Lt. W Burney

0‑426112

E

S/Sgt. R  P. Legault

6906400

E

S/Sgt J Coleman

6549391

G

Pvt. Joseph Hines

7021410

G

Pfc. H L. Ellis

6581672

R

Pfc. Ignatius Barron

6996085

R

Sgt L Keightley

6566286

G

Pvt. Horace Salmon

18034759

Feb 9 1942  MF9a At 0635 5 B-17W of 19th took off from Singosari to bomb ships in the vicinity of Makassar.

No. 2455

No. 2464

No. 2466

No. 2472

No. 2489

P Mathewson

P Schwanbeck

P McKinzie

P Key A. E.

P Hillhouse

CP Scarboro

CP Meyer

CP Smith

CP Webb

CP Furguson

N Wood

N McAuliff

N Rown

N Holan

N Penney

B Fesmire

B Henderson

B Miller

B Perkins

B Jones

E Rose

E Davis  S/Sgt

E Clark

E Geckeler T/Sgt

E Durham

R Parks

R Whipp

R Reuther

R Lumatainen

R McMullin

G Elder

G Logan

G Hernandez

G Murdock

G Kersch

G Gardner

G Frazier (FA)

G Williams  (FA)

G Bartee (FA)

G Baldwin  (FA)

[Note: FA= new gunners from Field Artillery.]

MF8b  (also independently reported as a Feb 8 mission)  At 2230 the following airplanes and pilots took off from Jogja on a bombing mission to search the area south and east of Makassar for enemy ships:

AL-609

AL-521

AL567

AL-570

Dougherty

Ezzard

Cool

Tarter

One airplane No. 570 had trouble with his landing gear and landed at 0005 Feb. 9.

MF8br  The 3 LB-30s returned to Jogja at 0750, 0825, and 0845, They searched the area, around Makassar and to the south and east of there but had no success. On their return two of then sighted concentration of Naval vessels off the south coast of Java one of which was reported to be a carrier.

Capt. Shed in B‑17E No. 41‑2483 off from Malang at 0835 for Bandoeng

MF9b At 0845 Lt Rouse in B‑17E No 41‑2486 took off to make a local reconnaissance to determine whether or not the report of the returning LB-30s was correct.

MF9br He landed at 1455 and reported concentrations, of Vessels which, when tied in with G-2 information led us to believe they were friendly. Their positions were reported, to the Navy.

MF9ar  The five B-17s which took off earlier this morning returned between 1230 and 1423.: They abandoned their mission because of weather. Positions of vessels reported by the flight were relayed to the Navy.

The courier plane,, K 1010 Lt. Michie,, pilot In from Jogja to Malang at 1730.

Shedd in B‑17E No. 41‑2478 returned from Bandoeng at 1740. He left No 83 at the depot.

            MF9ar  (second report) The flight cleared on the field at 6:25 am. The route out was south to the coast of Java, East along the coast to Ala Strait, North through the strait and then direct toward the objective, an enemy convoy reported south of Makassar. The weather was good with low scattered clouds from 4,000 to 9,000 feet to a point 100 miles from the target. There a strong front was encountered with a line of intense thunderstorms running N.W. to S.E. The area around the target had an uneven overcast, the bottom ragged from 10,000’ to 10,000’. The mission was abandoned because of weather. A message was sent to the flight of the raid on Malang Field at 10:52 and the flight dropped their bombs in the ocean to increase their endurance in the air. Return trip was by same route -- landing at 2:23.

            Ship No. 41-2472, Pilot Capt A. E. Key returned early, land at 12:27. 2nd Lt D. L. Holan was pronounced dead by the flight surgeon after ship landed. Lt Holan, Navigator, went from the navigators compartment to the radio room to operate radio guns when they were at about 20,000’. He called at short intervals each member of the crew to make sure he was in good condition. While at 28,000’ indicated, the co-pilot noticed an unusually long interval when Lt Holan did not call. On calling everyone answered except the Navigator. Investigation showed that he was sitting on the floor, his head bleeding, his oxygen mask was broken and pulled over onto one side of his face. Artificial respiration was given until landing. Ammonia respirators were used. Windows and doors of the compartment were closed and Lt Holan was kept very warm.  We MUST use more care in the use of Oxygen!

            An air raid warning alarm sounded on the field at 10-52 LCT shortly afterwards six small pursuit were seen circling the field wide a t approximately 18,000’; never attempting to descend of strike the field.

            ARF9 At 11:07 a formation of seventeen silver-twin engine bombers were seen approaching at 15,000’ from the West. They were in two distinct but close formations, eight in one lot and nine in the other lot to the left. They continued their run directly for the field, their bombs striking the Field-Artillery Barracks area to the southwest of the field at 11:28. Fires were observed from this area. The two formations then separated, the one of nine heading north and the one of eight heading south. AT 11:39 the bombs from the eight were exploding again in the Field Artillery Barracks area. This formation continued their course and disappeared to the north.

            It was apparent, during the raid, there was some activity over head, other than the usual run of enemy aircraft. Machine gun fire was heard and the diving of planes, both pursuit and bombers was observed.

            The first lot of bombs dropped were of the 100 lb fragmentation type. The second lot of bombs were of the 300 lb demolition type. Fifty-four bomb-craters were counted.  One native was killed, one American soldier and one native were injured from bombs during the raid.

            The weather over and surrounding the field, before and during the raids, was broken-scattered clouds, base at approximately 12,000’. Each time bombing runs were made from clear unlimited, unobstructed areas from cloud formation.  The all clear was given at 12:15 LCT.

            Information was received at 10:10 am that an LB-30 sighted carrier and four destroyers 50 miles south of Malang. The following aircraft and crew were dispatched on reconnaissance to that area.

            MF9c No 2486: P Rouse, J.A. 1st Lt; CP Fagan, D.W. 2nd Lt; N Meenaugh 2nd Lt; B Grant, J.W. 2nd Lt; E Lorber, V.J. Sgt; R Poulton, W.C. Pfc; G Pfoil (FA) Pvt; G Coburn, L.L. Sgt.

            Take off at 8:34. Route was 260deg to a point 75 miles south of Java and then parallel to the coast to a point ten miles east of Bali Island. Route back was the same except it was 50 off shore. The weather along the entire route was low scattered clouds from 4,000’ to 7,000’. Altitude flown 28,000’ indicated.

            MF9cr No aircraft observed, no anti-aircraft fire observed, surface craft: 1 convoy of 10 ships, 5 destroyers, 2 cruisers, and 3 small transports or auxiliary craft, were sighted at 10:05 at 9deg 10’ - 113 deg 30’ E on a heading of 95deg and an estimated speed of 15 knots. The plane returned to Malang landing 3:10 pm.

            The following airplane and crew departed Malang 10:00 for purpose of ferrying airplane No 41-2483, which was badly damaged by gunfire, to the Depot at Bandoeng and to return ferry airplane No 2478.  P Shedd, CP Burkey, C.M. 2nd Lt; N Weinberg, G.R. A/C; B Campbell, W. P. M/Sgt; E Mckenney, L. V. M/Sgt; r Warrenfeltz W. Sgt; G Androkovich, T/Sgt.

            No 2478 with above crew returned to Malang landing at 1800 LCT.

MF9d  From 2200 to 2230 four LB‑301s took off from Jogja at 10 minute intervals. Their objective was an aircraft carrier at 5”10' S 120” 20’ E. Planes and pilots:

AL-609

AL-521

AL567

AL-570

Basye

Helton

Crowder

Tarter

Lt. Tarter had trouble with the landing gear of No. 570 and landed at Jogja at 2400.

Java Operations disrupted --- to be continued

Hawaii to Australia --  Observation Duty for Carrier Task Force

Feb 10 1942 Maj Carmichael leads 12  B-17Es, attached to Navy for Carrier Task Force,

on 10 day trip from Hickam Fld Hawaii to Townsville Australia

            Beginning on 10 February, five crews from the 22nd, six from the 88th, and one from the 38th Squadron of 7th BG left Hickam Field to proceed to Australia, led by 88th Commander Major Richard M. Carmichael (41‑2429). One of the first departures was San Antonio Rose (41‑2416) piloted by 1st Lt. Frank P. Bostrom of the 88th. Thrown together into a makeshift squadron, the twelve B‑17s were now attached to the Navy for Carrier Task Force duty in the South Pacific and were identified as such by their red and white striped tail rudders.  They were supporting the Carrier USS Lexington (CV‑2) which was headed toward the Fiji Islands. Though each plane was to carry four 600‑lb bombs and a full load of ammunition, very little of the supplies that the group had brought to Hawaii were returned to them. Lt. George B. Munroe Jr was issued a sextant, an instrument with which he was unfamiliar, to use for navigation on the flight. He had been trained as a navigator using an octant, and it was a real job to convince the Hawaiian Command that he must have it to perform his job. He got his octant only after going to the Commanding General.

7BG-p277BG-p17BG-p47BG-p13

 The formation was divided into A and B flights, with A flight led by Carmichael and B flight led by Captain Ted S. Faulkner, the 88th pilot who had been selected for the aborted Marshalls/Carolines photo project before Pearl Harbor. A Flight was to proceed to Christmas Island, while B Flight was to go to Palmyra Island and then to Christmas Island, following A Flight by three days.

The movement of bombers was anything but a mass formation. Bostrom's tail gunner, Pvt. Herbert M. Wheatley, remembered that, "We were alone the whole trip. We did not see another American plane." Wheatley remembers stops in Palmyra, Canton Island, Vity, Levu, Fiji, New Caledonia, and Brisbane. At New Caledonia, "After landing, Bostrom had us man the guns until he could determine whether it was in control of Vichy French. What a laugh! A few .50‑calibers and no gas.  Where were we going? It was a miserable place.

"There were absolutely no mechanical problems on the trip. The most joy, if there was any, was seeing people gawking at the B‑17. Even the Aussies hadn't seen one with the tail gun."

Lt. Frederick C. Eaton, Jr. (41‑2446), with Lt. Henry M. Harlow as his Copilot, took off on the morning of 11 February on the first hop south to Christmas Island, a tropical layover rich with coconut trees. The airstrip had been carved out of the center of the coconut tree forest. Workmen building the field gave a tour of the island to some of the crews and supplied some with good luck charms to take on the trip. They gave Pvt. Howard A. Sorenson a knife made with shark's teeth mounted on its edges.  Later, it was to come in handy. Among others aboard Fred Eaton's bomber was Corporal Richard E. Oliver, who just three weeks earlier had survived a Pacific ditching in an LB‑30.

On 12 February after spending the night on Christmas Island, Eaton's crew flew southwest to Canton Island in a trio of B‑17s. Canton Island was a small coral atoll that had one tree and a landing strip.  The single tree, a coconut palm, had a platform mounted just below the palm branches and was a lookout post for the island. Most of the installations were underground, carved out of the coral. The mess hall and sleeping quarters were underground, and there were no facilities for transient personnel. The planes were serviced, and they continued their journey.  Patrol aircraft flying out of Canton had spotted an enemy submarine in the area hours earlier.

            On the 13th Eaton's crew left Canton Island headed southwest for Nandi, Fiji, flying formation through some of the worst weather they had yet encountered. It rained so hard they could not see out of the side windows. It was a wonder the engines kept running.  The trip took eight hours 45 minutes. The flight passed a Navy flying boat which looked "...like he was standing still..." and landed at Nandi in the afternoon. The heat was stunning. Officers were quartered in grass shacks close to the field, and enlisted men slept in tents on the flight line.

Orders were cut on 16 February, on the letterhead of Headquarters Southern Bomber Command, directing the 88th to depart Nadi airdrome, Nandi, Fiji, that day and to carry out a search mission while proceeding to the next stop at Noumea, New Caledonia, enroute to Townsville, Australia. The orders indicated that the 88th would move onward from Noumea on the 18th, the same day the 22nd's bombers would depart Nadi.

As the journey continued for the dozen B‑17s on 16 February, the first flight left Nandi for New Caledonia about noon. Major Carmichael led this flight and was to land at the De Vemiulle Airport but found that it was blocked off. Carmichael circled the field many times trying to decipher the printing in white letters on the runway. It told him to land at a field 95 miles to the northwest. Carmichael proceeded northwest and located a runway marked "OK". He landed and in about fifteen minutes signaled other circling B‑17s with a signal light that it was safe to land.

The final leg of the Pacific crossing brought the dozen B‑17s to Townsville, Australia, some of them flying at 100 feet off the water with a tropical storm directly in their path. The trip from Hawaii to Townsville had taken ten days or more, including 38 flight hours.

Java Operations continued

Feb 10 1942:  MF9cr At 07302 0825, and 0830 the three LB‑30's returned from their mission One of them could not locate the target but two of them did and bombed it. The results are uncertain. hot and heavy‑antiaircraft fire was received. One plane's propeller was bent from A.A. fire.

MF10  Six B-17E of the 7th Group took off at 0820. Objective was carrier at Sindjai (5”10'S 120”20’E). Pilots and planes

41-2488

41-2455

41-2472

41-2489

41-2464

41-2478

Strother

Horgan

Northcutt

Hardision

Maddus

Addams

MF10r The mission was abandoned because of weather and shortage of gasoline.  Three of the airplanes had mechanical difficulties and the formation lost time in the air waiting for them. The flight landed at 1515.

Lt. Swanson returned to Malang from Pasirian at 1604. He had made a deferred forced landing there on the 8th.

At 1810 Lt. Skiles landed at Malang in No. 41‑2454. It had been at Jogja for repairs.

Feb 11 1942  MF11  The following planes and crew departed Malang at 0900 LCT for purpose of proceeding to Palembang I, for service and thence for night bombing mission:

No. 3066

No. 2454

No. 2455

No. 2458

No. 2464

No. 2466

No. 2472

No. 2478

No. 2486

No. 2488

No. 2489

Montgomery

Skilos

Teats

Keiser

Bohnaker

Pease

Hoevt

Schaetzel

Vandevanter

Bridges

Green

Holdridge

Shmidt

Greene

Ferrey

Woods

Keller

Norvell

Snyder

Carpenter

Beekman

Hinton

Tarbutton

Heyman

Oliver

Work

Carrithers

Weinberg

Cappalletti

Cottage

Etter

Balzanelli

Seamen

Waldberg

Reeves

Miller

Campbell

Burke

Perkins

Fesmire

Stone

Pippin

Nock

Jones

Billen

Britt

Geckeler

McKenny

Peel

Clark

Matson

Hewston

Andrekovich

Chytil

Rose

Cipriani

Beardshear

Hartzell

Warrenfelz

Shafer

Makela

Lorber

McMullin

Lytle

Johnson

Wilfley

Gwinn

Fraser

Kelm

Baca

Gilbreath

Logan

Richardson

Coburn

Souder

Wingard

Murdock

Crabtree

Simmons

Jones

Connolly

Greelz

Reynalds

Baldwin

Combs

Perry

Connally

Williams

McKinzie

Norgard

Kersch

Hillhouse

Ruther

Tash

MF11r At 0900 eleven B‑17's took off from Singosari for Air Raid Precautions. They were prepared for a special mission, orders for which were later cancelled.

At 0930 four B‑17's and four LB‑301s took off from Jogja because of an air raid alarm. They were prepared for the same mission as the B‑17's from Singosari.

             The above planes all landed in the afternoon.

Feb 12 1942  MF12  From 0030 till 0220 eleven B‑17's of the 7th Group took off to attack enemy ships in the vicinity of Makassar. Ships and pilots:

41-2454

41-2466

41-2488

41-2478

41-2489

41-2459

41-2486

41-2462

41-2472

41-2449

41-2455

Strother

Habberstad

Beck

Northcutt

Swanson

Hardison

Key FM

Casper

Key AE

Mathewson

Preston

MF12r  "B" Flight consisting of No. 78, No. 58 & No. 89 reported that they believed they hit a boat. No. 62 had an excellent bombing run but could not observe results due to clouds obscuring the target. AA. was light. No EA. seen. "B" Flight landed at Madioen. No 54, No 66,No 86, No 72, No. 49, and No 62 landed at Malang. No. 62 later took off, delivered some parts to Madioen, and proceeded to Jogja No. 55 landed at Jogja. No, 66 came back to Malang early because of engine trouble.

            MF12r (second report)  The flight departed Malang 0100 and proceeded to Makassar. Makasar was reported burning. Bombs were dropped on lights off shore -- results undetermined. The flight landed Malang 0700 LCT.

The two LB‑30's returned to Jogja, Wade at 0850 and Ezzard at 0740. No results due to an overcast covering the target area,

No.AL‑515,, Lt. Kelsay, pilot, arrived kalang from Darwin at 1538, discharged 12 pursuit mechanics and some freight, and took off for Togja at 16200

MF12b Three LB‑30's took off from  Jogja at 2230 to bomb ships in the vicinity of the Anambas Islands.

AL-609

AL-521

AL-570

Dougherty

Fletcher

Cool

            Three B‑17E took off from Malang at 0905 for Pasirian for dispersion. They returned at 1525, 1530, and 1625. 

No. 2449

No. 2472

No. 2486

Pease

Hoevet

Keiser

             The following were assigned to the 19th Group this date:  P Jacques, P. D. 1st Lt; CP McAdams, M.L. 2nd Lt; N Dietch, W. A. 2nd Lt; B Heldreth, H. S. 2nd Lt; E Hawkins, J. T. Cpl; Guth, E.G. Pvt; Bunardzya, N.D. Pfc; Rentz, R. M. Pvt.

            Air Raid Alert: These crews remained on the ground ready to take off.

No. 2449

No. 2453

No. 3066

No. 2484

No. 2486

No. 2488

No. 2498

McKenzie

Vandervanter

Montgomery

Evans

Keiser

Bridges

Schaetzel

Wood

Carpenter

Holdridge

Wagner

Ferry

Beekman

Snyder

Carrithers

Etter

Tarbutton

Busbee

Work

Balzanelli

Cottage

Burke

Souder

Walberg

Surgeson

Campbell

Nock

Stone

Peel

Androkovich

Billen

Filigenzi

McKenny

Chytil

Hewston

Shaffer

Lytle

Cipriani

Nelson

Warrenfelz

Johnson

Norgard

Groelz

Perry

Gwinn

Linelis

Baca

Wingard

Coburn

Gilbreath

Hale

Crabtree

Hillhouse

Connelly

Sage

Hernandez

Feb 13 1942  MF12br The LB‑30's returned to Jogja at 0630, 0645, and 0830. They were unable to locate the target due to instrument weather in the vicinity. Mission abandoned.

B‑17D 40‑3066  Capt Shedd pilot, took off from Malang at 0830 and went to Pasirian for dispersion.  The following from Malang to Jogja: 2454 Skiles 0844, 2466 Habberstad 0848, 2449 Beck 0430, 2464 Preston 1010, 2462 Smith 1646.

(repeated report)  Pasirian dispersal B-17D No. 3066 with the following crew departed Malang 0900 for dispensing the airplane.  Shedd, Meyer, Peel, Shafer.

            The above crew returned to Malang at 1700 in Beechcraft piloted by Capt Persel.

Three B‑17E went from Madioen to Jogja this afternoon.

Capt. Slingsby came to Malang from Madioen in a C‑39 at 1725.

            Air Raid Alert: The following remained on alert ready to take off.

No. 2455

No. 2472

No. 2484

No. 2486

No. 2498

Adams

Teats

Beran

Rouse

Vandervanter

Railing

Breene

Putman

Carpenter

Webb

Rowan

Work

Leffing

Zatzke

Hoffman

Sage

Payne

Filley

Grant

Burke

Hewston

Provost

Carr

Androkevich

Kelm

Makela

Hertzell

Harmon

Poulton

Byers

Murdock

Petersen

Norton

Perry

Crabtree

Brown

Geckeler

Copley

Hale

Billen

Feb 14 1942  MF14a  Eight B‑17E took off from Jogja at 0215 to attack a reported convoy approaching north coast of the Island of Bangka.  They were instructed to attack by flight of 3's at dawn.

The above mission was ordered as a full effort against a large concentration of enemy vessels both naval and aux.

MF14a  report  All ships reached target area except No. 2455 which developed engine trouble and returned to Malang landing at 0710. No targets were sighted in the target area and planes were gassed up upon return to designated airdromes and told to stand‑by, At 1345 Hq called to say that everything was off for today but to prepare all in commission for T.O. at dawn tomorrow for another attack on same target. No. 86, 53 and 88 were ordered back to Malang from Bandoeng to prepare for mission.

Lt Vandevender in No. ___ landed at ___ and blow a tire. Arrangements were made for replacement tire to be sent to this airplane from Bandoeng. all other ships returned to Malang in the later afternoon between 1630 and 1730.

Lt. Godman arrived in Malang ship No. 3062 B-17D with P‑40 and A‑24 parts.

Two LB-30 No. 567 & No. 608 came over from Jogja to pick up 7th Gp. personnel and baggage. Landed at 1530 and departed 1630

MF14b  The following planes and crews departed Malang at 3:10 am for Bombing reconnaissance operations.

2453-3KKS

2455-66AUB

2472-Z6

2486-P9VM

2488-SG7Q

2498-P9VT

Pease

Adams

Teats

Schaetzel

Rouse

Vandevanter

Fagan

Railing

Breene

Putnam

Carpenter

Webb

Oliver

Rowan

Work

Cottage

Zatzke

Hoffman

Stitt

Sage

Payne

Stone

Grant

Burke

Clarke

Hewston

Provost

Pecher

Androkevich

Byers

Whipp

Makela

Hertzell

Norgaard

Poulton

Billen

Logan

Murdick

Petersen

Colburn

Perry

Crabtree

Reynolds

Bruise

Geckeler

Hale

Bills

Kelm

            Airplane No. 2455 (Adams) returned to Malang account engine trouble, landing Malang 0900. Airplane No. 2484 was scheduled on mission but failed to take off due to lights being out and engines rough.

            MF14br  The remaining five planes proceeded on mission. All planes became separated during the flight due to weather. No. 2486 started patrol at SE tip of Bangka Island and followed east to north and thence to west tip thence to Bandoeng. Patrol made at 25,000’. No boats were seen over entire patrol. Numerous boats were seen within 100 mile radius of Batavia. The plane landed Bandoeng. Proceeded to Malang landing at 1730. Pilot reports lack of information of our vessels in vicinity of target may have caused attack upon them. No. 2488 patrolled similar area at 30,000’ and made similar report. No 2488 landed Bandoeng and proceeded to Malang landing at 1730. No 2472 patrolled at 20,000’ over same area and made similar report. No 2472 sighted boat burning at 4deg25’S-106degE. A twin engine plane with single tail was sighted at 3deg30’S-106degE traveling fast. No 2498 landed at Kalidjati and blew a tire. Intelligence report was called in to Bandoeng. Plane will return here when repaired. No 2453 landed Bandoeng, serviced and departed for Malang. Bad wx was encountered and the plane landed at Jakja for the night. Intelligence report was called to Bandoeng.

Feb 15 1942:  MF15a  Three LB-30's of the 7th Group (11th Sqd.) took off from Jogja between 0200 and 0215.  Pilots  Lt  Markey, Capt  Crowder and Capt. Basyse. They were to bomb enemy ships in the vicinity of Palembang.

MF15ar  After they had flown on instruments for about an hour and a half each. The mission was abandoned on account of weather, They landed at Jogja at 0613, 0705 and 0800.

MF15b The following planes and crews departed Malang at 0610 for bombing operations off the coast of Palembang.

No. 2455

No. 2458

No. 2472

No. 2478

No. 2486

Hoevet

Parsel

Keiser

Jacques

Key, A. E.

Tash

Norvell

McAdams

Ferry

Holdreidge

Bean

Cappalletti

Griffin

Dietch

Etter

W;berg

Gregg

Miller

Hildreth

Sounder

Hanna

Matson

Baca

Hawkins

Pippin

Cipriani

Lorber

Shafer

Guth

Perry

Gwinn

Sanders

Strohecker

Bernadzya

Connolly

Connally

Jones

Huffman

Rentz

Androkovich

            MF15br  The flight departed Malang at 0610 for bombing operation against naval boats in Strait of Bangka. The flight took a direct route, climbing at 25,500’ over the target. Weather out was broken clouds with tops above 15,000’. At the target there was a high overcast at 30,000’ with lower broken clouds at 8,000’. Each plane carried eight 300 Kilogram bombs. The attack was made at 1010 on a course of 70deg at 25,500’. Bombs hit to the left of several transports. One near hit was seen on auxiliary vessel. Due to broken clouds all bombs were not seen to hit. Later smoke was seen to be emerging from the stern of a cruiser. One single engine EA was seen flying low over vicinity of target but failed to close. Moderate to heavy AA was encountered over the boats. Five transports, three cruisers, one very large transport (possibly a carrier) was observed. Airplane no 2458 and no 2486 landed at Madioen at 1330 for service. They took off at 1630 for Malang, landing at 1730. Airplane No 2455, No 2472, No 2478 landed at Bandoeng for service. No 2455 departed for Malang, landing at 1745. No 2478 failed to take off due to delay in service. No 2472 took off for Malang but due to approaching darkness and bad weather landed at Madioen for the night.

Airplane No 2453 (Pease) returned from Jogja landing at Malang 1720.

MF15brs (second report) They bombed by flights and from 28,000’ true.  One ship had 8 hung bombs and another had 4 but a hit was scored on one auxiliary vessel and another on a cruiser. Three planes used Bandoeng as an intermediate field and two used Madioen,  The two which used Madioen and one of those which used Bandoeng returned to Malang,  One remained at Bandoeng overnight and another went into Madioen overnight and another went into Madioen overnight when he could not make Malang from Bandoeng before dark.  Ships and pilots: No  58  Parsels, No 86 Key, A.E., No 72 Keiser, No 55  Hoevet, No 78  Jacques No EA., but A.A. encountered. Heavy, on level, and behind.

MF15c Three B‑17 off the 7th Group took off from Jogja at 1115 to attack enemy ships to the north of Palembang.

MF15cr They abandoned the mission because of very poor weather which made it impossible to maintain formation. Pilots  Beck, Smolser, and Bleasdale.  They returned at 1405, 1450, and 1540.

Feb 16 1942  MF16  Six B-17 of the 19th Group took off from Malang at 0830 to attack enemy forces in the Telang, Moosit and Oelang Rivers. Ships and pilots.

No. 2455

No. 2481

No. 2484

No. 2486

No. 2488

No. 2453

Mathewson

Bridges

Key F.

Schwanbeck

Green

Hillhouse

Scarboro

Beckman

Burcky

Meyer

Hinton

Wood

Balzanelli

Weinberg

McCauliff

Seamon

Burleson

Nock

Campbell

Henderson

Jones

Gardner

Chytill

McKenny

Davis

Schudl

Elder

Johnson

Warrenfeltz

Whipp

Lytle

Lytle

Clevenger

Wingard

Bartee

Logan

Kersch

Kersch

Hale

Stewart

Williams

Baldwin

Hernandez

Hernandez

            MF16r  The flight departed Malang two hours late due to low fog and mist. At 0900 No 2453 (Hillhouse) returned due to all three generators being out and batteries low. The route out was along the north coast of Java. The flight stayed at 5,000’ underneath the overcast until reaching Semarong where the weather became broken. After climbing to 13,000’ the wx continued to be bad and later the overcast broke below an overcast until reaching a point 150 miles south of the target where the overcasts came together. The weather was obviously unpenetrateable for a flight and the formation turned back at 11:45. The route back was to a point on the west end of Java thence along the south coast. At 500’ ceiling with a moderate rain existed from Parigi for the remainder of the route. Airplanes No 2486, No 2488 No. 2455 and 2484 arrived Malang at 1530 and landed. Airplane No 2481, became separated form the flight due to wx and landed at Pasirian at 1605. The weather at Malang was ceiling 300ft, visibility 2 miles. Rain and mist.  Five boats were observed at 5degS-106degE steering a course of 208deg.

MF16r (second report) One returned early (0916) with generators burned out (Lt Hillhouse In No. 2453). The others flew to within 75 miles of the target where a front prevented any further progress. The mission was abandoned and all ships landed Malang at 1530 except Bridges in No. 2481 who landed at Pasirian 1605,

Lt. Jacques in Malang from Bandoeng in No. 24789 at 0936. Returning from yesterday’s mission.

             MF16b At 1007 four B‑17's took off from Jogja and three from Madioen.  They were all from the 7th Group except one ship, Capt. Keiser in N0 2472, who is from 19th Group. [Airplane No 2472 with crew of Keiser, McAdams, Griffin, Miller, Baca, Shafer, Strohecker, Huffman, which were at Madioen, were ordered to join the 7th Group for their bombing operations this date.]

             MF16br  A rendezvous was affected and the planes proceeded to the target under ceilings of from 2000 – 4000’. One plane, No. 2452, Lt. Lindsey  pilot, lost an engine and returned to Jogja but Jogja was closed in and he landed at Malang at 1525. The other six planes bombed and hit with 48  300 kg. bombs 2 transports and 2 barges in the Banjoeasin River. They bombed from 2,000 feet and were hit both by light anti aircraft fire and by fragments from their own bombs, All six planes landed Batavia and remained overnight. Bad weather prevailed all over the island of Java and the entire flight was made under extremely unfavorable conditions.

Lt Vandevanter in No. 2498 returned to Malang from Kalidjati at 1516. He was returning from the Feb 14 mission of the 19th Group.

            Airplane No 2478 (Jacques) returned Bandoeng landing Malang 0940.

            No 2452, 7th Group (Lindsay) landed Malang due to bad weather. He landed with one engine out.

            Airplane No. 2498 (Vandervanter) returned to Malang from Kalidjati landing at 1500.

Feb 17 1942  MF17  The following airplanes and crews departed Malang at 0800 for bombing operations on Palembang Airdrome:

No. 2455

No. 2478

No. 2486

No. 2488

No. 2498

P Hillhouse

Schaetzel

McKinzie

Pease

Shedd

CP Fergerson

Snyder

Smith RS

Fagan

Greene

N Warson

Cottage

Work

Carrithers

Tarbutton

B Gooch

Stone

Furnald

Fesmire

Payne

E Cuningham

Pecher

Rose

Groetz

Provost

R McMullin

Lythe

Reuther

Richardson

Petersen

G Durham

Norgaard

Connally (FA)

Gilbreath

Geckeler

G Lyday

West

Brown D (FA)

Jones SJ

Sanders

            MF17r  The five crews listed above departed Malang 0800 for bombing operations against Palembang Airdrome. The route out was direct to the south tip of Sumatra in a line NE-SW. The flight climbed to 29,000 in order to get over the weather. The top could not be cleared. The second flight became separated from the first flight in the clouds. Both flights returned to Malang landing at 1420 LDT. All planes returned with bombs. Three friendly vessels were sighted 80 miles south of Malang at 1340.

Capt. Kaiser arrived Malang from Madioen in No. 2472 at 1812.

Lt. Kelsay in an LB‑30 arrived Malang from Bandoeng at 1740. Major Gen. Brereton, Brig. Gen. Harley, and Air Marshall Pierce were aboard.

            B-17E No 2497 (Lt Coleman Stripling) arrived from the US at 1815. The plane overshot the field in rain and darkness and collided with B-17E No 2472 which had likewise overshot the field and was stuck in the mud at the end of the runway. Crew was:

2nd Lt          Coleman Stripling                           0‑41619i6                     P

2nd Lt          Elton D. Brown                               0‑418657                   CP

2nd Lt.         L. B. Sogman                                 0‑430625                     N

T/Sgt           Elvin To Monorief                            6655309                      B

Pfc.             Sherwood go Jackson                     13022757                     1

Pfc.             Cyril 1. Moore                                 19011336                    G

Pfc              Robert A French                             14025963                    R

Pvt               Virgil Calton                                  13034669                      G

            Airplanes No 2458 (Adams) and No 2484 (Rouse) were scheduled on the mission but failed to take off. No 2458 was stuck in the mud, No 2484 had a rough engine.

            Airplane No 2481 (Bridges) was instructed to return Malang from Pasirian. He called later that in taxiing he had sunk in the mud and damaged two props. Steps are being taken to have the plane repaired.

            B-17E No 2472 (Keiser) arrived with crew at 1705. Due to the wet surface the plane overshot the field and stuck in the mud at the end of the runway.

            A party consisting of Maj Gen Brereton, Col Eubank, Air Marshall Sir Richard Pierce, Brig Gen Patrick Hurley, (Ambassador to New Zealand) arrived with Lt Kelsey in LB-30 at 1730 for the purpose of awarding decorations to members of the 19th Group. The following awards were made: [Diary is blank]

Feb 18 1942   MF18a  Four B‑17's took off from Madioen at 0340 to bomb enemy ships and barges in the Moesi and Oepang Rivers.  MF18ar  The flight was abandoned on account of weather and the ships landed at Madioen at from 0500 0910, They were 7th Group ships and crews, Pilots and planes:

At 0615 Lt. Kelsay in LB‑30 No. AL‑521 took off Malang for Darwin. Gen. Hurley was aboard.

The following crew departed as passengers in LB-30 at 0630 for Australia for the purpose of bringing B-17D back home from depot: Hillhouse, Watson, Gooch, Cunningham, Durham, McMillin.

            MF18b  The following planes and crews departed Malang at 0630 for bombing operations against transports and barges in the Moesi and Oepang Rivers near Palembang:

No. 2458

No. 2478

No. 2484

No. 2486

No. 2488

No 2498

Adams

Hoevet

Key A

Jacques

Rouse

Parsel

Railing

Prouty

Holdridge

Lorence

Carpenter

Norvell

Epperson

Bean

Etter

Dietch

Zatzke

Cappeletti

Sage

Walberg

Souder

Hildreath

Grant

Burke

Hewston

Billen

Pippen

Hawkins

Clark

Kramer

Makela

Cipriani

Perry

Guth

Poulton

Matson

Brown RD

Crabtree

Logan

Rentz

Rice

Coburn

Tomerlin

Gwinn

Androkovich

Bunardzya

Hanna

Lorber

            Crew in 2453 to Surabaya; Schaetzel, Snyder, Tarbutton, Brown DW, Paterson, Groelz.

            Gen Brereton departed 12:30, 02-18.

            MF18br  The flight departed Malang at 0630 and started on a direct route to the target. Due to weather it was necessary to follow the north coast of Java. The weather over the 1st half the route was broken clouds 3 to 7 tenths with base of clouds at 8,000’ and top at 12,000’. The second half of the route contained a series of fronts extending in a NE-SW direction. The fronts were located in the vicinity 110degE-5deg15’S to 5deg20’S-107deg5’E. A high solid overcast at 13,000’ with layers of stratus and nimbus clouds accompanied by frequent rain showers. The flight turned back 100 miles south of the target due to lack of gas caused by extra flying to avoid weather. The weather at that time appeared to be unpenetrable but may have been avoidable, to the east had the flight had sufficient fuel. The flight was at an altitude of 20,000’ when it turned back. Eight 300 kilogram bombs were carried in each plane. No bombs were dropped, no EA and no AA was seen. All bombs were brought back to base. The flight landed Malang 1440.

            The air raid alarm sounded at Surabaya at 11:45. The alarm sounded at Malang at 1215. The all clear sounded at Malang at 1250. A pursuit pilot (Lt Atkins) landed at Malang after having lost his way in a fight. He reports P-40’s attacked 17 Jap two-engine bombers at 2400 escorted by zero fighters. He saw three bombers shot down. later reports say five were downed. No bombs were dropped by enemy.

            Lt Bridges and crew returned to Malang from Pasirian in B-17E No 2481 at 1445.

            Lt Bohnaker and Shedd departed by train to Bandoeng to return here with new plane and crew.

             MF18c  Six B‑17's of the l9th Group took off Malang at 0630 to attack enemy ships in the Moesi and Oepang Rivers. MF18cr The flight was abandoned because of weather and the ships landed at Malang at 1415. Planes and Pilots:

No. 2498

No. 2478

No. 2486

No. 2484

No. 2458

No. 2488

Parsel

Hoevet

Jacques

Key AH

Adams

Carpenter

At 1125 there was an air raid alarm at Madioen, Three ships got off the ground and two others were left in the hangars. Nine ships strafed the field and hangars but only minor damage was done to the planes.

At 1338 Cap Schaetzel took off Malang in No 53 for Surabaya. He was to Take Gen Brereton and Air Marshall Pierce to Bandoeng,

At 1505 Lt Bridges in No. 81 arrived Malang from Pasirian

Feb 19 1942  Capt, Schaetzel arrived Malang in No. 2453 from Bandoeng via Surabaya.

            At 0705 five A-24’s landed Malang for service and bombs. At 0720 two others landed for the same reason. This was the first mission for the 91st Bombardment (L) Sqd. The mission was delayed due to the necessity of adopting Dutch bombs to the racks. Two 50 kilo and one 300 kilo were carried on each plane. Pilots were:

A-24 Pilots

A-24 Gunners

Maj E. N. Backus

Pvt F. H. Larrondo

Capt Galusha

T/S H. A. Hartmann

Lt Summers

Pvt E. S. Macky

Lt Launder

Pvt W. L. Kidd

Lt Hamburgh

Pvt J.K. Bryning

Lt Tubb

Pvt D. A. Simpson

Lt Ferguson

Cpl I. A. Luenicho

MF19a  Crews and planes were prepared for 0630 take off. At 0230 the bomber command ordered three planes to take off as soon as possible and the others at dawn. The target was given as 4 cruisers and two transports on the south coast of Bali. The first three airplanes were to bomb at night individually with single bombs. The first three planes cleared the airdrome at 0500.

No. 2478

No. 2484

No. 2498

Godman

Mathewson

Vandervanter

Carlisle

Scarboro

Webb

Meenaugh

Wood

Rowan

Wallach

Burleson

Fesmire

Provost

Gardner

McClellan

Michelson

Routher

Liimatainen

Wiest

Lyday

Kelm

Long CW

Elder

West

MF19a report  Cap Godman in No, 2478 made 4 runs on the target (one at 7,000’ and three at 18,000’. On the first run AA fire was too hot, on the 2nd. and 3rd. clouds hit the target and on the 4th. bombs were salvoed when 2 "0" fighters attacked. The fighters did not catch the B‑17. Capt. Godman landed at 0935, Lt. Vandevanter in No. 2498 made two runs. Time 0755. His bombs hung on the first and fell short on the second. Altitude 4,000. Landed at 1000. Lt. Mathewson in No. 2484 bombed a cruiser at 4,000’ at from 0705 –0720. Missed with first 6 bombs‑but got one direct out of last 2 bombs. Landed 1005. All bombs ‑ 300 kg. AA reported hot, heavy, and close by all ships.

Three B-17Es returned from mission at 1050. Crews remained in planes prepared to take off if air raid alarm sounded. The planes were re-serviced and loaded with 8-300 kilo bombs.

MF19ar (second report) Two B‑17's of the 19th Group ‑ Godman in No. 78 and Vandevanter in No. 98 took off at 1240. They attacked at 1435 from 27,000 feet. No. 78 missed a cruiser when it turned after bombs were dropped. No. 98 got a waterline hit on a destroyer. They landed at Malang at 1545. 300 kg. bombs.

            MF19b  Four B‑17's of the 19th Group took off Malang at 0605 to bomb ships off Bali.

No. 2452

No. 2458

No. 2486

No 2488

Lindsey

Schwanbeck

Tash

Green

Knudsen

Meyer

Kellar

Hinton

Sampeck

McAuliff

Hoffman

Seaman

Hickey

Henderson

Stitt

Campbell

Land

Davis

Baca

McKenny

DeSimon

Whipp

Norgaard

Warrenfeltz

Loser

Wilfley

Strohecker

Rice

Schreve

Logan

Connolly

Sanders

MF19br Two runs were made at 13,000t but no bombs were released as the flight was attacked by 3 "0" and 2 "97" fighters at 0835. One "0" was shot down. They attacked simultaneously from the right and left front. AA. moderate but fairly accurate. Landed at 1410.

At 1245 an air raid alarm sounded at Malang. Two A‑24’s took off for ARP and proceeded to Bali. Capt, Galusha in No. 757 hit a transport with one 50 kg. bomb, was 10’ right with another and 40’ R with a 300 kg. bomb. Lt. Summers in No. 800 hit the stern of a cruiser with on 50 kg. bomb and was 60’ to the left rear with a 300 kg bomb. The other 50 kg. bomb was not observed. They dived from 11,500’ to 3,000’. Landing was made at Malang at 1540.

MF19c Three LB‑30's took off from Madioan at 0645 to bomb enemy ships at Bali. MF19cr The mission was abandoned when the formation was attacked by nine "0" fighters at 0845 at 3,000’ altitude. Two fighters were shot down. All LB‑30’s were shot up some. They landed at Jogja at 1045.

MF19d Two B‑17's took off from Madioen at 0800 to attack enemy ships off Bali.  MF19dr One cruiser was bombed and hit from 14,000’ at 0955 and was smoking badly when last seen. Two "0" fighters attacked head‑on with no result. No. A.A, Landing was made at Madioen at 1420.

One B-17 Lt Casper  pilot took off Madioen at 1230 for ARP when an air raid alarm sounded. He proceeded to the target and at 1420 bombed a destroyer from 28,000’. Eight 300 kg. bombs hit at the waterline the length of the boat. No, E.A. or A.A. Landed Madioen at 1600.

Two B‑17E No. 41‑2493 and No 41‑2503, were destroyed at Bandoeng today. No 93 was destroyed on the ground by a direct bomb hit and No 503 was shot down. They were scheduled for delivery to the 5th Bomber Command.

            MF19ar  A three-ship formation of B-17Es took off from Malang at 0500am loaded with 8-300 kilo bombs, on mission to coast of Bali. Immediately after take off ship No. 12484 became separated from flight. After flight had taken course of SE until 80 miles off south coast of Java, it then took up course parallel to coast of Java and continued over and to the east coast of Bali, where ship No. 2498 became separated from leader ship No. 2478.

            Ship No 2478 began attack at 7:45 making course of 165deg at 7,000’. No bombs were dropped due to low clouds and accurate and intense AA fire from enemy naval craft. Altitude was then gained up to 23,000’. As Clouds obstructed good run, a descent to 18,000’ was made where two runs were tried but due to cloud coverage over target no bombs were dropped. On fourth run 2 Zero fighters jumped the ship and the bombs were salvoed, results undetermined.

            Ship No 2498 landed at 9:35 after losing leader near target picked as his target a separate destroyer at Cape Meboeloe. On first run at 7:55 at an altitude of 4,000’ bomb racks failed to operate and no bombs were dropped. On second run at 4,000’ altitude all bombs fell short of target. AA fire was heavy caliber at first, then pom-pom went into action. Both were fairly accurate. One fighter with fixed landing gear made an unsuccessful  attack on them. Landed at Malang 1000.

            Ship No. 2484 also in the same vicinity started his bomb run at 7:05 at an altitude of 4,000’. Six bombs were dropped but all failed to make a hit. A second run at the same altitude was made, dropping two bombs, the first one a direct hit on a heavy cruiser at center-right of ship. The second over-shooting the target. No enemy aircraft were encountered but AA fire was heavy and close.

            Enemy naval craft observed is as follows: 4 destroyers, 2 transports of 8,000 class, 2 subs, Many barges

            Weather at field was low scattered clouds, visibility poor. On route low scattered clouds to high broken cumulus over targets, thick layers of clouds starting at 2,000’ tops continuing on up to 25,000’ with intermittent rain areas.

            MF19c These planes with the same crews departed Malang at 1240 for second mission of the day to Den Passac and Bali.

No. 2478

No. 2484

No. 2498

Godman

Mathewson

Vandervanter

Carlisle

Scarboro

Webb

Meenaugh

Wood

Rowan

Wallach

Burleson

Fesmire

Provost

Gardner

McClellan

Michelson

Routher

Liimatainen

Wiest

Lyday

Kelm

Long CW

Elder

West

            Air raid alarm was reported at Surabaya at 1205. Planes and crews on the ground ___ up were alerted for take off. The air raid alarm at Malang sounded at 1240, at which time three B17Es departed on their second mission of the day. Two A-24 (Gulusha and Summers) took off for purpose of clearing the airdrome. Their mission was being help up for arrangement with Pursuits for escort. These two pilots proceeded to target and made direct hits on a transport and a cruiser with 50 Kilo bombs, other bombs were water line misses. (These pilots should be cited for their excellent start for their squadron war action.) Report of this operation was taken and called in to Bomber Command. The all clear at Malang sounded at 1320. Enemy planes did not reach Malang.

            MF19br  The flight of four B-17Es listed above and led by Captain Schwanbeck departed Malang at 0605 for bombing objective at Denpasar, Bali. The route out was to a point 100 miles south of Malang thence NE to a pint 60 miles east of target, thence direct. The flight climbed to 18,000’ enroute then descended to 11,000’ in the vicinity of the target in order to get underneath the overcast. Two passes were made over the target but broken clouds prohibited the leader from making a sighting run, consequently no bombs were dropped.

            The flight was intercepted by 5 EA three of which were zeros and two 97’s. Two “zeroes” attacked simultaneously from the left and right front above. Practically all guns in our planes fired on the pane on the left. It started smoking and passed out of sight underneath. It was believed shot down. The other plane fired and made two 30 cal hits in No 2458. They did not seem to be using cannons. Another simultaneous attack was made by two zeros from the left and right. One pulled away before getting in range, the other continued the attack and passed underneath the formation without firing. (Capt Schwanbeck reports that evasive action taken just as the fighter puts his sights on is the most effective solution to their head on attacks.)

            Anti-aircraft was encountered over the target at 13,000’. Bursts appeared 3 or 4 at a time at about 50’ difference in altitude. Many bursts hit less than 100’ from our planes.

            Two large transports were observed about 1 mile off shore east of Denpasar. Two cruisers were seen maneuvering in the channel outside the transports. One small freighter was seen anchored off the SE tip of Island of Java.

            Weather enroute was clear over water off south coast with front paralleling coast just off sleeve. Broken clouds existed over the target with large cubus and scattered thunder storms in the vicinity.

            The flight stayed together and returned to Malang, landing at 1410.

            Airplane No 2452 (Lindsey) was attached from 7th Group.

            MF19cr  Three B-17’s with crews listed above led by Capt Godman departed Malang at 1240 to bomb warboats and transports at Denpasar. The route out was direct to South tip of Bali, then direct to target. The Weather was broken cumulus clouds at 10,000’ to 35,000’. Airplane No 2484 (Mathewsen) left the formation over south coast of Java due to cracked cylinder head. He returned to Malang landing at 1510. The two remaining planes continued to the target and chose individual targets. Godman attacked a cruiser with 8-300 kilo bombs from 27,000’ true. The cruiser turned as the bomb release line was reached and the bombs fell 200 ft right. Vandervanter attacked a destroyer and transport with the same bomb load from 25,000 ft. The bombs hit across the destroyer and along side the transport. It is believed one bomb hit the stern of the destroyer. Two bombs were near misses on the transport. The two planes returned direct and landed Malang at 1545.

            These three crews were taken to solecta, a mountain resort nearby, where all enjoyed a two day rest with per diem for their expenses. This is the first time this has been put into effect. It is hoped more crews can be given this opportunity to relax.

            Airplane No 41-2417, Capt McPherson, pilot, arrived form the US (Honolulu Route) and landing Malang at 1755. It tried to land at Denpasar due to wx at Malang but was fired on by the enemy who had taken the place the previous day. Many hits were made on the plane and T/Sgt Sam Ranger was wounded in the foot. He was hospitalized at Malang.

 

Feb 20 1942  MF20  Three LB‑30s of the 11th Sqd., 7th Gp, took off from Jogja at 0615 to bomb enemy ships off Bali. They were led by Capt. MF20r Wade and made an attack from 13,500’ at 0825 in which they each dropped 8  300 kg. Bombs. They got 3 direct hits and 8 waterline hits on a cruiser which was left burning.  No EA but heavy A,A which did no damage. Landed Jogja at 1015.

Seven A-24s of the 91st Sqd., 27th Group took off from Singosari at 0645 to attack enemy ships off Bali. They were escorted by 16 P-40s. At 0812 they attacked diving from 12,000’ to 2,000’ – 4,000’. Major Backus in No 766 had all three of his bombs hit amid ship on a cruiser (each plane carried 1  300 kg bomb and 2 50 kg bombs and picked a separate boat for its target ‑ six naval vessels‑cruisers or destroyers.  Lt Summers in No. 800 hit the stern of his boat with 2  50kg. bombs and missed the stern by about 50’ with the 300 kg bomb. Capt. Galusha in No 757 and Lt. Hambaugh in No. 610 each put 2  50's amidships and the 300 about 25’ off the bow on their ship. Lt Ferguson in No. 804 was 150’ right with all his bombs. Lt. Tubb in No 796 is missing. Landings were made at Singosari between 0919 and 0930. No. EA. encountered but AA fire put a hole in one airplane and might have been the cause for Lt Tubb diving in the water.

Missing

2Lt: D. B. Tubb                         0‑411633                                       P

Pvt. D.S Mackay                       19000309                                      G

2Lt R H Laundor                      0‑429818                                       P

Cpl. I A Lnenioha                    6581779                                        G

MF20b Three ships of the 7th Group led by Capt, Hardison took off from Madioen at 0840 to attack enemy ships off Bali. MF20br  At 1130 they bombed and sank a large transport from 22,000’ (when last seen it was burning and listing). Moderate for 1000’ difference in altitude in salvo. Nine "0" fighters were sighted but did not close. Landing was made at Madioen at 1230.

             MF20c  Seven B‑17s of the 19th Group took off from Malang at 0642 to attack enemy ships off Bali.

No. 2455

No. 2458

No. 2478

No. 2484

No. 2486

No. 2488

No 2498

P Pease

Parsel

Bridges

Adams

McKinzie

Rouse

Keiser

CP Fagan

Strippling

Lorence

Railing

Smith

Carpenter

Ferrey

N Carrithers

Capalletti

Balzanelli

Weinberg

Work

Zatzke

Griffin

B Jones

Yiene

Nock

Sage

Heldreth

Grant

Miller

E Groelz

Matson

Chytill

Hewston

Billen

Clark

Hainkins

R Richardson

Shafer

Johnson

Makela

Cipriani

Poulton

Guth

G Gilbreath

Lorber

Wingard

Tomerlin

Gwin

Rice TJ

Bernardzya

G Williams

Coburn

Stewart

Brown RD

Crabtree

Bills

Rentz

             MF20cr  Led by Cap  Parsel they bombed two destroyers, one of which was towing the other. Altitude of attack was 26,200’ time 1155. Two runs were made. On the first one ships racks stuck and another released only two bombs, The train fell short. On the 2nd. run the bombs hit between the two ships. AA was low and to the right rear.  One "0" fighter attacked from the rear about 30 miles south of the target. It put 5 bullet holes in one B‑17. Your other fighters chased the formation but did not close, Landings were made at Malang between 1351 and 1455, Pilots and Planes; Parsal ‑ No. 58, McKenzie ‑ No 86, Pease ‑ No. 55, Rouse ‑ No. 88, Kaiser ‑ No. 98, Adams ‑ No. 84,, and Bridges ‑ No 78.

AR F20 4 B-17Es destroyed Several air raid alarms were sounded during the day but no raiders came. However, shortly after the last ship landed at Malang nine enemy "0" fighters were sighted above the field at about 10,000’. There had been no alarm. Four of the fighters attacked the airplanes on the ground many of which still had the crews in them. Five of the planes were set on fire (3 burned completely and 2 were extinguished and some parts may be salvaged), About four or fire men were injured  among them Lt. Ferry, who received a compound fracture on one of his legs from a bullet. The enemy also strafed Madioen but no damage was reported. The planes which were destroyed at Singosari were all B‑17Es. Their numbers were: No. 41‑2455, No. 41‑24840 No. 41‑2488, No. 41‑2498, and No. 41‑2478.

            Seven A-24’s at 0645 took off on bombing missions. Airplanes and crews were as follows:

1st Flight

2nd Flight

Maj Bacchus

Capt Galusha

Lt Summers

Lt Hambough

Lt Launder

Lt Tubb

Lt Ferguson

            Sixteen P-40 pursuits came over field as A-24’s took off to escort A-24’s on mission. Co-ordination and timing excellent.

            Seven B-17 Crews as above took off at 0840 to attack enemy cruisers or destroyers and transports off Klaeng Kong, Bali.

            Second flight of two A-24’s landed Malang at 0945. One ship, pilot, Lt Tubb went into water during attack on cruiser, he did not pull out of his dive. Possible (1) hit by AA, (bombs did not release and could not pull up in time. Capt Galash, leading this flight reported hits with 50 kilo bombs amidship of a cruiser --- over bow about 50 ft with 300 kilo. Lt Hambaugh reported hits with 50 kilos on cruiser ??r LD) and near misses with 300 kilo.

            1st Flight (Maj Backus leading) landed 1,000, with one ship missing, Lt Launder D???tl??

            1. Maj Backus reported direct hits on cruiser amidships port side with ??? kilo bomb. Two 50 kilo hits on deck also. Recommended citation for Backus -- bombs released 2500 ft.

            2. Lt Summers -- 300 kilo missed stern, estimated 50 ft. Two 50 kilos his stern of ship which appeared out of control after hit.

            3. Lt Ferguson missed with all bombs, 150 ft starboard side.

            4. Lt Launder unreported.

            All A-24’s were camouflaged in revetments when an air raid alarm sounded at 1025 -- considerable friendly pursuits were seen to north but no enemy shops were spotted. All clear at 1740.

            Four B17s landed Malang 1355; pilots as follows:  No 55 Pease, No 58 Capt Parsel, No 86, McKenzie, No 88 Rouse

            Airplanes #58 and # 86 were towed to hanger and revetments respectively for repair; remaining crews stood by airplanes in event of air raid alarm. Three other B-17’s of main flight landed 1455. Pilots as follows:  No 78 Bridges, No 84 Adams, No 98 Keiser.

            Airplanes were dispersed on field and crews left standing by.

            MF20cr (second) First flight of four B-17s bombed two cruisers off Klaeng Keng; for the first time reported by this pilot the string of bombs fell short; last bomb hitting very near starboard side of small cruiser. Bomb racks on No 88 stuck, and were salvoed later. Only two bombs released from No ___, remaining six were salvoed.

            Second Flight -- reported possible hits on two cruisers or DD’s. (Note: these two ships were close in line, appearing as though one was towing the other.) Bombs hit close on starboard side and between these ships thus: No smoke or flame was observed however. Flight was attacked by one “O” fighter at 24,000 ft. Holes in Bridges ship - (one explosion) no injuries or damages.

            ARF20: At 1552 nine fighters appeared over Malang heading north at about 8,000’. No alarm sounded and check with Dutch Headquarters identified these as American Pursuits. About five minutes later 4 or 5 “O” fighters strafed the airdrome making first attack from N to S. (Note: The nine American Pursuits were not American Pursuits but “O”s. Strafing continued for about 5 minutes. A flight of 4 “O”s remained at altitude during the attack.

            Three B-17s were burned to ground -- total loss.

            One B-17 nose section burned before could be extinguished, all other parts OK.

            One B-17 shot full of holes -- extent of damage unknown. (Both tires flat.) Quick action by many officers and EM saved considerable equipment out of these airplanes; ie, guns, ammunition, tail sections, wing tips, engines, etc.

            During the heaviest strafing, a large airplane, believed to be an LB-30 was seen flying low south of the field, Lt Nanny left his shelter and ran to the radio truck parked near the hanger and radioed the airplane to keep away from the field. It turned and headed west no report of it since received. Recommend citation for Lt Nanney.

CASUALTIES OCCURRING IN RAID:

                        a.  Killed: None

                        b.   Seriously injured:

                                    1st Lt James P. Ferrey, 0352477

                                    Sgt C. W. Greelz, 6581250

                        c.   Slightly injured:

                                    Pfc Bernardzya, N. D. 6999625

                                    Pvt Rentz, Ralph M. 20324856

                                    Cpl Harborgh, Edward W., 16028568

                                    Sgt Richarson, Arthur L., 6829694

                                    Sgt C. O. Jones, 6849776

                                    Sgt. Gilbreath, Harry L., 19051315

                                    Pvt  Wingard, Joseph O., 14029256

            First strafing plane attacked No 98 on the field an completely surprised personnel around plane. Personnel started to the shelter when 2nd plane attacked. Personnel again lay on ground. Lt Ferrey was seen to be dragging himself along. McKinzie at barracks heard strafing and caught ride to edge of field. He ran across field and arrived in time to help Keiser carry Ferrey to shelter in sandy bay 150 yards away. This occurred while planes were still strafing. Citation of Keiser and McKenzie.

            Crew assignments had been made for the following day and all crews were at the planes cleaning guns and servicing the planes. Lt Pease and Sgt Greelz were in the cockpit of No 55 when tracers started coming through the fuselage. Men in the field were saved by sand bag emplacements. Strafing planes were of the Navy 97 type with blue noses. They attacked individually and opened fire at about 800 yards and 150’ altitude. Method seemed to be to watch 30 cal tracer and when right to open fire with cannons. Our gun positions were not manned when the attack started. Some firing was done from the ground but about the time the EA were leaving. None were hit. They withdrew in a southeasterly direction.

            Newly arrived B-17E crew of R. Williams Crew worked all night preparing every available plane for a mission the following day.

Feb 21 1942  MF21a Two LB‑30's flown by Lt Ezzard and Hughey took off from Jogja at 0235. Their objective was enemy ships in the vicinity of Bali with Denpasar Airport as secondary objective. One plane dropped its bombs on a tent camp and the other dropped on what it thought was the airport. No results, Five or six pursuit planes gave chase but did not close, Landed at Jogja at 0730.

MF21b Six B-17's of the 19th Group took off from Singosari at 0640 to attack enemy ships or the airport at Bali. Planes and pilots

No. 2453

No. 2458

No. 2472

No. 2481

No. 2486

No. 2507

Key AE

Hoevet

Cobb

Tash

Schaetzel

Green

Burcky

Prouty

Greene

Kellar

Snyder

Hinton

Etter

Bean

Dietch

Hoffman

Cottage

Seamon

Souder

Henderson

May

Burke

Stitt

Campbell

Androcovich

Davis

Hanna

Baca

Pecher

McKenny

Perry

Whipp

Dambacher

Kersch

Lytle

Warrenfelz

Hale

Wilfley

Marel

Norgaard

Brown

Rice

Logan

Morris

Jones ?J

Petersen

Bartee

MF21br One ship lost two engines, another had a fire in the bottom turret, another had generators and electrical system go out, and the fourth had a gunner pass out from lack of oxygen (is now OK.). Capt. Schaetzel and Capt. F.M. Key completed a flight in which at 27,000' they went from Malang to a point 100 miles south of Malang then east till opposite east coast of Lombok,, north till directly east of Don Pasar Airport, then west to Bali. Visibility was excellent but they were unable to locate the airport. No ships were sighted on the whole circuit. Landings were made at Singosari between 1135 and 1305.

            Lt Green in “07” landed at 1135. Bottom turret caught on fire but was extinguished after leaving flight. Did not complete mission.

            Notified that four P-40s would be over Malang at 1200 to protect our returning ships.

            At 1150 Lt Hoevet in No 58 landed with two engines feathered (#3 and #4) Hoevet did excellent job of flying and landing considering two engines out on same side. No 3 broken oil line No 4 believed cylinder head split. Did not complete mission. (Recommended for citation.) Hoevet would be killed when performing skip bombing test in Australia using B-17s.  Mareba Field would be named after him.)

            Lt Tash, No 81, leading 2 element landed at 1155. After Hoevet and Green pulled out of flight he tried to catch preceding element but could not, he turned back and overtook Hoevet remaining with him as some protection until landing.

            Lt Cobb, in No 72 landed 1215. A rear gunner became violently ill and nearly passed out when at 26,000’. Cobb went down to 20,000’ until gunner was better but could not overtake flight. Returned to base.

            Capt Key, AE, landed 1230. This ship remained in formation with leader. Landings were made several minutes apart in order to permit camouflaging and dispersion.

            Capt Schaetzel in No 86 landed 1305. Schaetzel and Key made long flight around Island of Tombak, crossed target but unable to make bombing run due to haze and inability to spot target. No enemy naval or air activity was reported.

            All ships were camouflaged or run in hangers, maintenance and repair started immediately. Report telephoned to Headquarters 1330.

MF21c Three B‑17's of the 9th Sqd., 7th Group, took off from Madioen at 1005. Their objective was enemy ships off Bali or the Denpasar Airport. No ships were sighted so the airport was bombed from 26,000’ at 1215, Results unknown due to clouds over target at time of impact. Eight 300 kg. bombs were dropped by each plane. No EA or AA  Lt. Swanson ‑ flight leader, Landed Madioen.

Three "0"*fighters strafed Madioen and three  others strafed Malang, No damage. No warning at Malan.

            The air raid alarm sounded at 0853. At 0915 five “O” fighters were sighted about 5 miles SW (toward Malang) flying low, heard no firing at this time. The all clear sounded at 1000.

            At 1010 three enemy fighters crossed field at low altitude, strafing. This attack was made before the warning could be given. Another fast attack was made by those strafers -- apparently at dummy planes on field. No damage was done. Two had belly tanks, one with [none]. All clear at 1100.

            Air alarm sounded 1330. All clear 1430.

            Received orders to make early morning mission to Denpasar with three B-17s. Information brought by Maj Broadhurst of Headquarters. Efforts redoubled on maintenance and camouflage.

Feb 22, 1942. MF22a The 19th Group sent two B-17Es against the Denpasar Airport on Bali,

No. 2472

No. 2486

No. 2507

Mathewson

Vandervanter

Godman stuck in mud

Scarboro

Webb

Carlisle

Wood

Rowan

Epperson

Burleson

Fesmire

Clark, DE

Gardner

McClellan

Routher

Liimatainen

Lyday

Kelm

Wiest

Elder

West

Long CW

MF22ar  They took off at 0540 and attacked the airport individually from 23,000’ at 0720. Bomb load was 8  300 kg. bombs each. Lt. Mathewson in No. 72 started four or five fires on the field, hit the hangar, and set it and four or five planes near it on fire. Lt. Vandevanter in No. 86 hit the runway and started two fires on it, No EA or AA. About 16 twin engined planes were sighted on the field. Landing made at Singosari at 0830 by No 72 and at 0930 by No, 86. No surface craft sighted around Bali,

            Ground fog delayed take off until 0530. Godman tried take off but wet ground retarded speed so much that a second try was made. While taxiing back ship became stuck in covered bomb crater. Other two planes took off 0530. Unable to take off. Lt Mathewson in No 72 landed at 0830, ship run into hanger. All clear sounded 0845.

            (second report) Mathewson No 72 and Vandervanter No 86 climbed direct to target bombing run at 23,000’. Bombing individually. Vandervanter made run on NW-SE runway. Bombardier counted 12 airplanes parked along runway and three were burning after bombs hit.

            Mathewson aimed at hanger on north edge of field. Three bombs hit short, three in hanger, two over. Four enemy aircraft counted parked around and near hanger, believed burned.

            (Note: Perfectly executed mission which undoubtedly retarded enemy actions and destroyed planes and equipment. Recommend for citation, unusual courage and good judgment.)Air raid alarm sounded at 0720. Few minutes later one enemy fighter strafed field, firing on Dutch hanger (#3). No damage.

SA F22a Enemy strafers attacked Jogja and destroyed LB‑30 No AL 567.

SA F22b Enemy strafers attacked the Pasirian field and destroyed four B‑17's which were dispersed and camouflaged there.  Three attacks were made at different time of the day. The numbers of the planes destroyed were: No. 40‑3072, No 40‑3066, No 40‑3070, and No 3062.

            Air raid alarm sounded 1520. No enemy aircraft observed. All clear 1630.

            Four P-40s over field above overcast and did not sight strafer.

            Lt Carpenter in No 86 landed 0900.

            Orders received to alert three crews for early morning mission 2/23. Crews alerted.

            Orders received to begin preparations and plans for move to alternate base.

Lt Launder and his gunner, Cpl. Lnenichap returned to Malang this evening. They bad had a forced landing off Bali on Feb. 20. They sank a transport with their bombs that day.

Lt Launder and Sgt Lenicka (A-24 Pilot & CC) had oil line break and made crash landing on surf 20 KM north of Denpasar. They started walking north and finally came to a town. They were taken care of, fed coconut juice and bananas and carried across channel to Java.

Feb 23 1942  MF23  Two B‑17E of the 7th Group took off from Madioen at 0530, Their objective was the DenPasar Airport at Bali. Bombs were dropped from 27,000’ at 0835 by dead reckoning as clouds obscured the target from time to time, Results unknown. No EA, or AA.  After the bombing a reconnaissance was made around the island of Bail at a distance of 25 miles off shore. Landing was made at Madioen at 1000. Pilots and planes were Capt. Preston in No 62 and Lt Lewis in No 61* a, third ship was forced to return because of engine trouble. Numerous air raid alarms sounded during the day. Singosari was bombed but no damage resulted.

No Malang mission ordered.

            Malang Air raid alarm sounded 0655. At 0750 flight of nine enemy bombers crossed over field at about 20,000’ in general westerly heading. No bombs dropped on this run, believe our fighters caused this, there was considerable aerial activity, sounded like individual combat and attacks. One enemy bomber (leading first flight) began smoking. He pulled out of position, was replaced by leader of third element. Smoking plane took up lead of third element. Flight made wide circle to left and crossed field west to east dropping bombs. No damage done to installation of personnel. All bombs hit in open area, south of FA barracks. Flight continued in SW direction one ship still smoking badly. Altitude of bombers estimated 20,000’. Size of bombs, 100s or 200s.

            One P-40 landed here about 0810 for servicing and ammunition. Took off 0910. All clear sounded 1000.

            Preparations being made for move to another base. To send essential personnel with 22nd.

            Air raid alarm sound 1120. No enemy aircraft.

            All clear 1150. We’re loosing considerable valuable time by these false air raids. Native quite work and go anywhere from 5 to 10 KM from field. Discipline however is excellent.

            Air raid alarm sound 1220. No enemy aircraft sighted. All clear sounded 1300.

Feb 24 1942   To Australia  The following officers and EM departed for contemplated southern base (Australia) in B-17E No 507, 1245 JCT.

No. 2507

Passengers

Passengers

P  Hoevet

Capt Schwanbeck

M/Sgt Etheridge

CP Prouty

Lt Pease

M/Sgt Griffin

N Cappelletti

Lt Bridges

M/Sgt Schumaker

E  Davis

Lt Fagan

T/Sgt Stevems

R  Whipp

Lt Rouse

Sgt Heron

G  Logan

G  Wilfley

            Capt Schwanbeck in command of detachment to set up camp, if necessary and to look over situation.

            Verification is being checked on reports that Sgt Sulfridge manned gun in a B-17D at Paserian while in was being strafed and shot down a Jap fighter.

            B-17E No 61 landed about 1700, Pilot Lt Evans, for repair. Evans was enroute to Bandoeng. Airplane fixed and pilot instructed to take off at daylight 2/25.

Feb 25 1942  Echelon of officers and EM departed by train for new base in Java. (to catch ship for Australia)

            MF25  The following airplanes and crews took off 0530 on bombing mission to Denpasar Airport, Bali:

No. 2453

No. 2486

No. 2507

Keiser

Key, AE

Godman

Holdridge

Burcky

Carlisle

Tarbutten

Etter

Eppersen

Nock

Souder

Wallach

Baca

Androkovich

Wiest

Shafer

Perry

Gwin

Chytil

Pippin

Tomerlin

Brown, DW

Long CW

             Take off was scheduled for 0415 but delayed by low oil pressure and no left eng (#1 engine) on No 53. No 507s batteries were too weak to give boost or light.

            Five minutes after take off Capt Key landed because of suspected crack in fuselage in about four feet from tail. Discovered by tail gunner. Inspection not yet completed. No 81 took off 0550.

            Godman and Keiser landed 0845. Ships run into hangers immediately after landing.

            Air raid alarm sounded 0855. One enemy fighter reported. All clear sounded 1115. No enemy sighted.

            Following officers and men departed 1400 for Jokjakarta in B-17E No 5207:

No. 2507

Passengers

P  Mathewson

Col Eubank

CP Scarboro

Maj Combs

N  Woods

Maj Backus

E  Geckeler

Capt Parsel

R  Kershch

Capt Schaetzel

G  Reuther

Capt Keiser

G  Sage

Lt Tash

             Above listed passengers with exception of Col Eubanks permanently transferred. (These passengers were assigned to Gen Brereton to reestablish the 7th BG in India.) 

            Capt Hoevet in No 2497 landed 1825. Maintenance and repair began immediately. Capt Hoevet reported conditions at base not suitable for operations. Shortage of fuel, no ammunition or bombs, little food, no communications or transportation other than by air. Hoevet brought back letter to Col Eubank from Col Perrin.

            Two crews alerted for mission tomorrow.

Feb 26 1942  To Australia  Following crews and passengers departed Malang 0145 for South Base.  All passengers to remain there, crews to return tonight.

No. 2453

No. 2497

Passengers

Passengers

Passengers

Passengers

P  Teats

Key, FM

Maj McDonald

Lt Heald

Sgt Strahecker

Pvt Guth

CP Beekman

Holdridge

Capt Montgomery

Lt Norvell

Sgt Whitehead

Pvt French

N  Hoffman

Tarbutton

Capt Morroco MD

Lt O’Bryan

Sgt May

E  Clark

Baca

Capt Cummins

Lt Gregg

Pfc Elder

R  Norgaard

Shafer

Lt Jacques

Sgt Payne

Pfc Bernardzya

G  Colburn

Chytel

Lt Cobb

Sgt Peterson

Pfc Crabtree

G  Billen

French

Lt Stripling

Sgt Randell

Pfc Michelson

            Mathewson in No 2507 with Col Eubank landed 0610 from Bandoeng.

            Air raid alarm sounded 0650. All clear 0715. No enemy aircraft sighted.

            Air raid alarm sounded again at 0840. All clear 0930. No enemy aircraft sighted.

            No mission ordered today.

            Some bases around here must be catching hell, brings home value of rapid and careful camouflage when airplane is not flying.

            B-17Es No 2453 and 2497, pilots Key and teats landed 1830 form south. Maintenance began immediately.

            Received orders at 1400 to sent one ship on reconnaissance to Makassar area, Mission canceled.

            Two A-24s No 41-15757, Pilot Galusha and No 41-15810 Pilot Hambough, took off 1815 on night bombing mission to Bali area. Results: unknown. Glide bombed 9,000’ released at 5,000’. These ships landed 2100.  Following crew and passengers departed for south:(Australia)

No. _____

Passengers

P  Godman

Capt Adams

CP Carlisle

Lt Kellar

N  Eppersen

Lt Corrithers

E  ?

Lt Snyder

R  ?

Lt McAuliff

G  ?

G  ?

Missions Summary

Mission

Route – (Target)

Results

MF1

Malang >3 Balikapan>3 (Shipping)

Djogia < 3

1 ship sunk

MF2

Malang >8 Balikapan >7 (Shipping)

Malang <1 faulty gun  < 7

1 ship sunk & 1 hit

MF3

Malang >9 Balikapan >9 (Shipping)

Malang <6  1 died no oxygen

Sourabaya < 2  2 wounded

Arenba beach <1 eng fire 5 bail out

Unknown due to weather  1 EA shot down

Author Adamczyk radio operator bailed out, put in hospital,

makes it to Aus via US purchased “escape” ship

airplane will be flown off beach on plank runway.

AR3

Air Raid on Singosari (Malang fld)  

2 B-17D & 2 B-17E Lost

SD3

Strauble B-18 shot down

1 B-18 and 7 crewman lost

SD3

Cox B-17C shot down

1 B-17C and 7 crewman lost

MF5

Malang >9 Balikapan Borneo  > 6  (shipping)

Makabg < 3  < 6  guns & Oxygen out

Attack by  8 EA

 no bombs dropped

AR5

Air Raid on Malang

MF7

Malang > 8  Makassar Straight 

Malang < 8

Searched sea area between Borneo and Celebes

but found no ships

RF7

19 rescued from Del Monte Feb 4

By LB-30 via Darwin

MF8

Malang > 9 Kendari    (Air Field)

Malang < 7  2 B-17Es shot down

9-12 EA  shoot down 5 EA

DuFrane &  Prichard: 18 crew members bail out (died).

RF8

3 rescued from Del Monte

By B-17 via Darwin

MF9a

Malange > 5 Makassar Straight

Malange < 5  1 dead no oxygen

Searched sea area between Borneo and Celebes

but found no ships

MF9b

Jogja > 3 LB-30 Makassar Straight

Jogjia <  3

Found no shipping

Believed they sighted carrier

MF9c

Malang  > 1B-17 Search for Carrier

Malang <  1

Searched for carrier, found none

MF9d

Jogja > 3  LB-30  Search for Carrier

Jogjia <  3

Returned to searched for carrier

They believed they had seen.  found none

MF10

Malang  > 9 B-17 Search for Carrier

Malang <  1 turns back <8

Searched Sindjai area for carrier

 bad weather found none

MF11

Malang  > 11 B-17   Makassar Straight

Called off due to Air Raid

AR11

Air Raid on Malang

MF12

Malang  > 11 B-17  Makassar Straight

Hit ships & saw them burning

AR12

Air Raid on Malang  12 ac on standby

MF12b

Jogja 3 LB-30    Anambas Island

Result unknown

MF14a

Jogja 8 B-17   Bangka Island area

Sea search, ships not found, bad weather

MF14b

Malang 6 B-17 Bangka island area

Sea search, ships not found, bad weather

MF15a

Jogja  3 LB-30  Palembang shipping

Instrument weather

MF15b

Malang 5 B-17  Palembang shipping

Saw boats in straight of Bangka

MF15c

Jogja 3 B-17    Palembang shipping

Bad weather

MF16a

Malang 6 B-17   Palembang rivers

Bad weather

MF16b

Jogja 4 B-17    Palembang  rivers

Hit transports and barges 

MF17

Malang 5 B-17    Palembang

At 29,000’ high weather low on gas, returned with bombs

ACL

Malang  2 new ships 

 New B-17 crashes into another both in mud & out of action

MF18a

Madiaeon  4 B-17 Palembang  rivers 

Telang, Moei, Oepang    very bad weather 

MF18b

Malang  6 B-17    Palembang  rivers 

Telang, Moei, Oepang    very bad weather 

MF18c

Malang  6 B-17    Palembang  rivers 

Telang, Moei, Oepang    very bad weather 

MF19a

Malang  3 B-17    Bali shipping

Partial success bomb racks fail

MF19b

Malang  4 B-17     Bali shipping

Attack by 3 EA 1 EA shot down, no bombs dropped

MF19c

Madiaeon  3 LB 30  Bali shipping

Attack by 9 EA   abandon mission

MF19d

Madiaeon  2 B-17  Bali shipping

Attack by 2 EA  hit 1 cruiser

MF20a

Jogja  3 LB-30     Bali shipping

3 direct hits

MF20b

Madiaeon  3 B-17  Bali shipping

Hit transports

MF20c

Malang  7 B-17  Bali shipping

Hits-n-misses

ARF20

5 B-17E Lost

MF21a

Jogja  2 LB-30     Denpasar

Partial success

MF21b

Malang  6 B-17  Denpasar

Couldn’t find field gun & oxygen problems

MF21c

Madiaeon  3 B-17  Denpasar

Airport bombed

MF22

Madiaeon  2 B-17  Denpasar

Airport bombed

ARF22

Jogja  AL-567 LB-30  Lost

ARF22

Pasirian B17D 3062, 3066 2070 3072 Lost

35 missions   266 AC take offs 4 returns

33 Airmen Killed

Java AC Feb 1942

38 AC Feb 1  plus 3 US to Java = 41  to Java   minus 27 = 14 to Australia

AC

No

Arrive

Lost

To Aus

B-17E

41-2453

013142

022542

B-17E

41-2488

020742

021542

B-17C

40-2062

010142

020442

B-17E

41-2455

012642

022142

B-17E

41-2492

020542

020942

B-17D

40-3062

010142

022242

B-17E

41-2456

011942

020942

B-17E

41-2493

021942

021842

B-17D

40-3066

020842

022242

B-17E

41-2458

013042

022542

B-17E

41-2494

020742

020942

B-17D

40-3067

012742R

B-17E

41-2461

011442

022442

B-17E

41-2497

021742

022542

B-17D

40-3070

022241

022242

B-17E

41-2462

021142

022442

B-17E

41-2498

020942

022142

B-17D

40-3072

022241

022242

B-17E

41-2464

012142

021442

B-17E

41-2503

021942

021942

B-17D

40-3074

020341

020342

B-17E

41-2469

012142

020442

B-17E

41-2505

021042

022542

B-17D

40-3078

022241

022242

B-17E

41-2472

011542

022542

B-17E

41-2507

022142

022542

B-17D

40-3079

012542R

B-17E

41-2478

012842

022142

LB-30

AL-508

012642

022542

B-17D

40-3097

Swoose

012742R

B-17E

41-2481

021442

022142

LB-30

AL-515

020542

021542

B-17E

41-2417

021942

022542

B-17E

41-2483

013142

022942

LB-30

AL-521

012642

022142

B-17E

41-2427

012842

020342

B-17E

41-2484

020942

022142

LB-30

AL-533

013042

022142

B-17E

41-2449

020942

022542

B-17E

41-2486

020742

022542

LB-30

AL-567

020442

020742

B-17E

41-2452

021142

022542

B-17E

41-2488

020642

022142

------------End of Diary-------------

JAVset1

Contributing Java Experience Authors

Our Java Experience by T. Swanson pilot

             Within 3 days, Jan 25, they had us on our first mission. They gave us Fred Crimmons for a combat experienced pilot. We ran short of gas and. landed on a beach on the northeast edge of Java. We asked, the Dutch for some jacks and 300 plankas ("plankas" is Dutch spelling for English "planks").  The Dutchman said "300 plankas? Hell, there is not 300 plankas in all Java." They did lend us Ad Vink and his light house tender, the Polestar. He stood off shore while we used the one barn jack to jack up one wing as high as we could and put plankas under that wheel and shoveling a lot of sand too. Then we would jack up the other wing. We kept repeating this until we had our plane out of the sand and could build a short runway of plankas. One night Captain Ad Vink invited us to dinner in his cabin. He started off with a good dry martini and boy, after a hard day of jacking and shoveling it sure eased the pain. On Jan 28 we put in just enough gas to get to the field, ran up about 60 inches of manifold pressure, released the brakes and we were off the beach. The prop blast picked up those heavy plankas -- three inches thick, a foot wide and eight to ten feet long! Some of the plankas struck the horizontal stabilizer and put some holes in it.

            We were each authorized one telephone call from Java to home. Both Earl and I put in our requests. We stayed up until after midnight trying to get our calls through and then up at six for a mission. After two weeks of this we were so tired we had trouble staying awake flying formation. I would backhand Earl and say "You fly this thing while I nap awhile." A few minutes later Earl would backhand me and say the same thing. Then the Nips would attack ending our napping procedure and put us in a scared wide awake mode. All this time, Gladys knew I was O.K. because I was trying to call her. It was sure good she did not know the true facts.

            [02-08-42] On about the third mission, I was flying on Duke DuFrane's right wing. Just after takeoff a little gremlin yelled in my ear "Swanson, you are not coming back today". We were jumped by about 20 Zeros. They came directly at us head on with little lights blinking in their wings. I said "I'm not scared", but I looked down at the bag of my oxygen mask and it was hyperventilating. Later, I learned that the blinking lights were muzzle flashes, then I got scared! The best we can figure is that Tom Schumacher was flying on Dukes left wing. I noticed a flicker of flame through Duke's small radio operator's window and before I could pick up my mike and tell him to salvo everything, flames were coming out the side gunner's window. The crew started bailing out. That's quite a decision -- To bail out of a flaming B-17 full of bombs into a shark-infested sea. I guess they decided right because DuFrane's plane descended 2000 feet and exploded. We never found any of them.

            When we returned to Malang it was under attack so we landed at a small auxiliary emergency field and promptly sunk up to our axles in mud. So the gremlin was right, but not in the way I thought. He almost made a coward out of me. We got about 500 natives and two good ropes and out we came. They sent Captain Montgomery over to fly the plane out -- I guess they didn't trust me yet.

            I guess I borrowed. Al Key's plane while mine was being fixed. Al was real unhappy. He said "Ted, I lend you a perfectly good airplane and what the hell do you do? You take it out and get it shot full of holes!" I brought it back and there were only 20 holes in the wing.

            Our mess sergeant ran out of food and the only thing be could find locally was nest ripened eggs. He could not fry them because they would run too flat, so he made them into a French toast mixture and the cockroaches would fall into it overnight and would end up nice and crisp on the toast. Then to make matters worse, they put the mess hall in the latrine. After waiting in line for a half hour breathing those intriguing latrine fumes and after eating delicious french toast with a couple of nice crisp roaches with Borden's sweetened condensed milk for syrup, we were so combatish we would fight anything or anybody! Now I knew why the staff of the 19th Group put the mess hall in the latrine!

            [02-03-42]  On 8 Februarywe made a raid on Balikpapan on the east coast of Borneo. We made our bomb run at 25,000 feet and were attacked by several Zeros, setting our No.1 engine on fire. They also hit us with a 20 mm explosive shell just below the left gunner's position and blew the sides out of a couple of ammo cans and several flying suits on the center catwalk. There was suit fur and shrapnel all over the back end of that plane, but not a scratch on any crew member. I gave an order to bail out over Arendis Island on the south edge of Borneo, then we landed our Queen wheels up on the tidal flats. Earl quickly put out the oil tank fire. The tide came in and almost covered the wings. The mosquitoes had, a feast and we had no sleep. Earl shook hands with the island chief and talked him out of a cooking pot for the dove I shot with our survival shotgun. The next day the US Navy picked us up in a Dutch Dornier flying boat. They were unhappy that we took so long to get out to deep water in our rubber life raft because we insisted on taking the Norden bomb sight with us. It sure made us sad to leave the Queen that had taken us halfway around the world, through several missions and off a beach. If we had just feathered the engine at altitude and let it get really cold, there would have been no hot oil to feed the flame and the fire should have gone out and could have easily flown back to base on three engines and saved the plane for all those urgently needed spare parts. So much for late information and questionable judgment.

            [02-12-42]?We took off one night for an early raid on Palembang, Sumatra. We really experienced St. Elmo's fire that night. Each raindrop that hit the windshield fluoresced and each prop was a disk of fluorescent light. The bombardier, Neil Reynolds, came out of the nose like a scared rabbit. He screamed "Sparks are jumping off my machine gun a foot long!" It was a real eerie experience.

            We were supposed to make our bomb run just below the cloud cover, but the clouds kept lowering so when we broke out and started the bomb run, we were at 2000 feet. We could see the ack-ack guns on the ships firing and then a black rose would appear in front of us. This continued for the entire run.

            On another mission, a gunner, reported to be John Hines, called out, "I have been hit in the stomach". I could envision blood and guts all over the place. A Jap 30 caliber had ricocheted off the large wooden 250-500 round 50 caliber shipping box that we sat on the narrow catwalk below the side guns. We fed the ammo from this box through the flared bottom of a small ammo can so the gunner would not have to use valuable time to change cans when under attack. The bullet went through his flying jacket, through his flying pants and fell down inside his pants. He said it felt like a mule had kicked him in the stomach.

            [03-02-42] We were moved from Malang to Madiun just before this mission. We stayed at Madiun until we evacuated Java on 2 March 1942 at midnight. We had picked up a new navigator, Thomas B. Joyce. We headed for Broome Australia and landed about 08:00. He missed his ETA by less than two minutes, and I never congratulated TB for this excellent job.

            Our landing at Broome was one hour or one hour and one day from a big Jap raid on Broome that sank a Dutch flying boat full of refugees. We had 18 refugees aboard our B-17. Then down to Perth, where I got a little confused and landed at a small field of only 2700 feet! Now our problem was to get off and to the right field so we could get some gas. I should say "petrol". Some of the crew celebrated a little too much and got thrown in the brig. Earl couldn't talk the Aussies into letting them out so we had to take off for Melbourne without them. They said that was the longest damned train ride they ever want to take! When we arrived in Melbourne, the 19th Group was in the process of reorganizing. We got settled into the Regency Hotel and had a large meal of lamb, but I guess it was mutton because that night I was feeling real bad and had to go to the toilet one could smell the sheep jumping out of the barn. I felt so horrible the next morning that I checked in to sick call. The doctor sent a blood sample in for a check. After several hours, he said "That can't be, that's an Oriental disease". Then he told me that I had Yellow Jaundice. He put me in an Aussie hospital. My close friend to be was there. Our main no-fat meat course was TRIPE! After three weeks of a tripe diet, Jim Etter couldn't stand it any more and got us transferred to the U S Army 4th General Hospital. Of course, I didn't complain! They called us the Gold Dust twins we were so yellow. We drove the nurses nuts with our maverick bridge playing. After I was released from the 4th General, I checked into the Regency again. I put on all the clothes I owned, went to bed and shivered! Then walked the streets and shivered! I was real happy when they gave me a B-17 and sent me up to Cloncurry, Queensland where I recommended that they check Earl out as a First Pilot. Unfortunately, the check pilot said "No". I had made Earl do half the landings and take-offs on our entire trip to Java. Later, he was checked out O.K.

[04-??-42] Shortly after my arrival at Cloncurry, I came down with Dengue fever or bone-break fever which is a better name because you ache all over and the minute you twitch you feel great, but the second you relax it hits you again. After two weeks of twitching on an aspirin diet, you are so tired you don't know what ailed you, but by then the fever has run its course.

            They immediately made me Train Commander to take the 30th Squadron to Mareeba on the Atherton tablelands 50 miles west of Cairns. It was quite a trip.

            On 1 August I went up to Port Moresby as a spare flight leader and ended up spending all night helping other crews load their bombs. One crew had raised one bomb three times and couldn't hook the shackle on the bomb rack. Due to a design error the sling was made too long. By putting a pillow between sling and bomb, it solved the problem. On 12 August 1942, I was transferred to the 8th Service Squadron at Charlieville as Flight Test Maintenance Officer. My experiences there in the 45th Service Group is another story.

            Many of the Replacement crews moved up to Port Moresby and participated in the subsequent year and a half fight to reach and take the Marianas.

            Many of the original 19th BG, at Clark Field Philippines, returned to the States to form up new B-29 units for operations out of the Marianas, they would not return until Feb 1945.  (end Swanson)

Our Java Experience by T. Adamczyk radio operator Swanson’s crew

            We were assigned to the 28th Squadron of the 19th Bomb Group; we enlisted members of our crew were quartered in the Dutch barracks where our sleeping quarters consisted of straw mats lying on the floor.

            [01-25-42] Six days after our arrival at Malang, on the 25th of January, we were scheduled for our first bombing mission. Nine B-17s took off early in the morning - target, a Japanese convoy off the port of Belikpapen, Borneo. As we took off over the rice paddies and fishing weirs along the Javanese shore and headed for the blue, I couldn't help wonder if I'd see another sunrise. As we cruised along toward our target, slowly gaining altitude, those nine B-17s, bristling with machine-guns and loaded with four 600-pound bombs each, looked quite formidable - in terms of what our forces threw against the Germans in Europe they were quite puny.

            After a three-hour flight, as we approached Belikpapen at an altitude of 25,000 feet, we spotted the convoy, consisting of several transports, a cruiser and two destroyers. The Japs threw some ack-ack at us, but at our altitude the black bursts were well below us. We dropped our bombs; from this height our supposedly highly accurate secret Norden bombsight was not too effective - the Japanese cruiser and destroyers had too much time to maneuver before the bombs reached their target. A hit was scored on a Japanese destroyer, but that certainly was not going to stop the Japanese on their drive to the South.

            We saw no Japanese Zero fighters over the target, and after heading back for home and descending to a lower altitude where we could remove our oxygen masks and converse, there was a feeling of elation, of relaxation - this combat flying wasn't so bad! However, one of the B-17s in our formation developed engine trouble and lagged behind - it was attacked and shot up by a Zero. The plane returned to base safely; however, one of the waist gunners was hit in the leg above the knee by an explosive bullet and died due to loss of blood.

            Our flight, however, was not over yet - we had counted our chickens too soon: we ran into a tropical storm off the island of Madura, a short distance north of Java. The turbulence was so violent that we could not fly through it - our tool boxes and loose equipment were flying around like match-boxes as we attempted to get through the storm. Lt Crimmins, one of the veteran 19th pilots, was our first pilot on this, our first mission; Lt. Swanson flew co-pilot, while "Rabbit" Longacre sat this one out. We had insufficient fuel to get back to our base at Malang, so Lt. Crimmins picked a stretch of beach on Madura Island, bounced our wheels on it to see if it was hard enough, and made an approach to land on it. We really sweated that landing out: Ferraguto, Forte and Sweeder sat bunched together on the floor of the radio-room, ready for the worst. I sat in the radio operator's seat, from where I could see the beach as we approached it - I could call out our altitude to the others. Strangely, I was not overly concerned, as if B-17s landed on beaches every day. When we made our touchdown, that landing was velvet smooth, and the roll shorter than any we had ever made.

            So there we were, stranded on the beach, with no one but a bunch of Javanese natives around. After about an hour a Dutch three-engine Dornier flying boat spotted us, landed on the water off the beach and picked us up. Forte and Lt. Frumk1n stayed with the aircraft, while the rest of us were flown a short distance to the seaplane base at Soerabaya, Java. Here we got some very welcome chow and a good nights sleep in decent bunks.

            We learned that three other planes of our nine-plane mission had to make belly landings in rice paddies when they too were unable to get through that tropical storm. So we hadn't done too badly - at least we had landed on our wheels. However, those wheels were half buried in the soft sandy beach, where they had sunk down to their axles after the plane had stopped it’s forward roll.

            Lt. Crimmins was not about to leave this valuable aircraft which we had flown half-way around the world stranded here on this forlorn beach; he was what I would consider a genuine hero. Immediately following the high altitude bombardment of Clark Field in the Philippines on the first day of the war by 75 Japanese bombers, while the field and hangar line were under machine gun strafing by low-flying enemy aircraft, he had rushed into the burning hangar which contained his assigned airplane and started the engine to taxi it to a place of safety. However, he was wounded in the head and arms, and his plane was destroyed. On this mission he flew with our crew he still wore a bandage on his head wound, which had not yet completely healed.

            After looking the situation over, he decided that if we could Jack our plane up enough to get the wheel s out of the sand and build a temporary runway, we could get the plane off. So he contacted the Dutch authorities at the Dutch naval base at Soerabaja; they agreed to send a ship with jacks and heavy wooden planks out to the plane. After all, this bomber had come halfway around the world to help them fight off the Japanese - that was the least they could do for us.

            So, the morning after the Dutch seaplane had taken us to the base at Soerabaja, we got aboard a torpedo-boat which took us back out to our beach B-17. That was quite a ride on that speedy torpedo boat, although I was glad when it ended - I was getting somewhat seasick.

            That night we all slept in the plane. During the night, the Dutch lighter carrying planks and large house-jacks arrived; early the next morning we went to work. We spent the rest of the day bringing the planks from the boat to the shore, quite a difficult task, since the lighter had to stay at least a hundred yards out from the shore because of the shallow water, and the planks were quite heavy, about four by twelve inches wide and quite long. Forte and Sweeder had a close call in the afternoon; they were on their way back to the shore in a small boat when one of those quick tropical storms came up and caught them on the water. They finally made shore about a half mile down the beach.

            Using the house Jacks, we were able to jack the plane up enough to get the wheels out of the sand, placing some heavy planks under the wheels. Then we kept laying planks side by side, horizontally, away from the plane down the beach, thus making a short, runway. We had about a hundred natives working for us, and had quite a great time bossing them around.

            That evening the captain of the Dutch lighter invited us to stay aboard his ship overnight. We gladly accepted his invitation - we got a good meal aboard, had some good Dutch beer, and good bunks to sleep in!

            The following morning we finished the plank runway out to a distance of approximately 150 feet. We stripped the plane of everything we could to lighten it, such as ammunition, tool boxes, even our waist-guns. We pumped enough fuel into the gas-tanks to get the plane back to Malang, and were ready for the big moment.

            [01-28-42] Only the pilot and co-pilot were aboard the plane - the rest of us stood by on the beach, to make the plane as light as possible - and for safeties sake too. We all had our hearts in our mouths as Lt Crimmins gave her the gun and the plane started down that short runway, the propwash sending planks flying backward. Once the plane got rolling pretty well, it no longer required the planks, and was airborne in as short a run as I've ever seen. As the plane lifted off amid the cheering spectators and made a bee line for Malang the rest of us went back aboard the Dutch lighter and headed for the naval base. The captain of the ship gave us a bottle of Bols gin, which helped us to celebrate the successful, but somewhat delayed, return of B-17E #12469 to base. Lt. Crimmins later was awarded the DFC for this accomplishment.

Our Second Mission-

[01-29-42] The following morning we caught a ride aboard one of our Army trucks to our base at Malang, a distance of about seventy miles. Two days later we and our B-17 were combat-ready; we took off in a nine-plane formation on another mission against the Japanese steaming down through the Makasser Straits. The weather was atrocious enroute - we could not get through to reach our target and returned to base without dropping our bombs.

            That evening we enlisted crew members caught a ride into the city of Malang, a few short miles from the base. Java, along with most of the East Indies, was administered by the Dutch colonialists. The city of Malang was quite large, with a population of over 100,000 people, good restaurants, stores, most of the amenities of what was considered to be a modern city at that time. The native Javanese, members of the Melanesian race, were of small stature, very few over five foot tall. We were approached quite often on the street by young women, so short that they looked like little children, but old enough to ask the inevitable question, "Mac-Mac?", which in Javanese was the sales-pitch for the oldest profession in the world. They had no takers, as far as we were concerned. We found a restaurant where we had a good steak dinner, then proceeded to get somewhat inebriated on that good Dutch beer. Eventually, when we started looking for a ride back to the base, Leo Ferraguto climbed into the driver's seat of one of our GI trucks which was parked in the area. He was going to drive it back to the base; fortunately, he was unable to start it - the penalty for stealing GI trucks could have been quite severe. We were able to hitch a ride back to base, that is, all but Reynolds, our bombardier. He came in sometime later during the night - he had got hold of a goose somewhere and brought it back to the barracks. He swore it was a duck, and took it to bed with him, but got rid of it a hurry when it messed in his bed.

Our Third Mission-

            [02-03-42] A couple of days later we took off on our third mission against the Japs. We were part of a six-plane formation, flying in the tail-end of two Vees. George Sweeder was manning the twin-fifty, manually operated tail-guns; Leo Ferraguto was in the power-operated top turret up front, while Reynolds and Frumkim each had a single 30-caliber machine gun firing forward. Norm Forte manned our Bendix power-operated bottom turret - this was an abomination, since one had to sight the target in a remote sight in a mirror while lying on one's stomach - this type of turret was soon replaced by a locally-controlled ball-turret on later models. I manned the waist guns - both of them. These were single flexible 50-caliber’s, one on each side of the aircraft aft of the radio-room. The fallacy of this system was that I could be manning only one gun at a time - the other side of the aircraft was unmanned. This too was soon corrected - shortly after this mission another gunner was added to the crew so that both guns were being manned.

            Anyhow, on this mission the weather was beautiful. As we approached our target at an altitude of 25,000 feet, we could see several freighters, including a large troop transport, escorted by a couple of warships, in the harbor of Belikpapen, Borneo. Again there was some ineffective anti-air craft fire bursting below us. As our bomb-bay doors opened, in my position in the radio room I could look straight down through the open bomb-bay. What a sight! As we dropped our four 600-pounders I could follow their trajectory most of their way down. As they were released at first they seemed to drop behind the plane. Then they seemingly moved forward in an arc with the speed of the aircraft. I lost sight of them as they neared their target, then I observed the splashes in the ocean where most of our formation’s bombs fell - and I saw two hits on the transport: We did not hang around to see if it had sunk - whether it was our bombs or one of the other planes we'll never know.

            As we turned homeward we spotted a single Jap Zero flying along with our formation several hundred yards off to our right. Lt. Longacre, our co-pilot, was coaching us gunners on the interphone to make sure that we were ready for the attack when it came, cautioning us to fire in short bursts. Suddenly the Zero turned directly for our formation, and, as luck would have it, picked our plane for its target, probably because we were tail-end Charlies. As I pressed the trigger  grips on my right-side gun, it fired one round, then jammed. That was a helpless feeling - here comes this Jap plane spitting bullets at us - I couldn't fire back and no place to hide! There were at least two gunners firing out of each of six B-17s at that single Zero, yet on that first pass, as far as we knew, no one had hit him. Prior to our approaching the target area I had been kneeling on my heavy flying jacket - it was not needed in the tropical climate - as I watched at the open waist-gun window. As that Zero made that first pass at us, I thought I saw some smoke in our aircraft - when I picked up my flying jacket afterward I found it perforated with holes - it had been hit by an explosive bullet!

            After that first pass, the Zero flew along on the other side of our formation, then turned toward us and came at us again. This time I was on my other gun, firing short bursts, as per instructions from Rabbit Longacre on the interphone. I would love to be able to say that we blew that Jap out of the sky; however, to be completely truthful, I must say that that Japanese pilot bore a charmed life - we may have hit his aircraft; if so, he seemed to be in control as he spiraled downward and disappeared.

            Shortly thereafter our formation descended to a lower altitude to where we could take off our oxygen masks; we were beginning to relax back in the rear of our aircraft; I had a feeling of exultation - we had been in mortal combat, and had survived! I had no inkling of any problem, when Forte pointed out to our number one engine. The prop was feathered, and we could see some flames near the oil tank. Lt. Longacre came back through the bomb-bay and told us to get ready to bail out. We were over a small island off the coast of Borneo, with a long overwater flight ahead of us, and the possibility, or probability, of the oil fire spreading into the gasoline; our pilot thought we had better get out while we could.

            So I helped Lt. Longacre pull the emergency door release on the rear exit of our B-17 - we were at an altitude of about 5000 feet. When the door flew off, Lt Longacre told me to bail out. I looked at him, as if to ask, do I have to? " He told, " Go ahead." And out I went!

            As I went out the exit I immediately grabbed hold of the rip cord handle of my backpack parachute - I wanted to be sure I could find it. I had also loosened my fur-lined flying boots, anticipating the possibility of landing in the ocean. One was supposed to count up to some predetermined figure on bailing out of an aircraft - as far as I can figure I must have pulled that rip-cord almost immediately as I left the aircraft, before my body had time to decelerate. At any rate, when the chute opened I felt a terrific jolt, and a bad pain in my left knee. When I reached down to feel my left knee I could see that it was dislocated. As I descended I pushed it back into place.

            Actually, I believe I would have enjoyed the ride down had not my leg hurt so. The sudden quiet after that noisy aircraft was quite a contrast. The landscape below looked beautiful - blue water, sandy beach, and green coral - and it seemed as if I was floating down like a feather. That is, until I hit the ground! I couldn't have picked a much better spot - I landed in about six inches of water, right off the sandy beach on the east side of the island. Even though the water and sand were soft, when I hit I felt quite a jolt - I knew right away that I was out of commission. As I lay there in the shallow water, catching my breath, a song went around in my mind, "I'm a Rambling Wreck from Georgia Tech." Tradition had it that one must hold on to his rip-cord after bailing out - I still held mine in my hand as I lay there. And I remember that I cut off the small pilot chute off the main chute with the six-inch hunting knife which we crew members carried; I wanted it for a souvenir. Amazing what goes on in peoples minds at such critical times!

            After lying there a few minutes while regaining my composure, I began to wonder what had happened to the rest of the crew. Unknown to me, after I went out the door, Norm Forte was supposed to follow me - when he stood in the door at the exit he froze - the others behind him had to push him out. Ferraguto and Sweeder followed him out. As a result of Force's hesitation there was an interval between when I went out and when the rest of the crew bailed out; the others landed on the other side of the approximately one-half mile wide island. Reynolds, the bombardier, started out the forward bottom exit, changed his mind and tried to climb back up into the plane but Frumkin stepped on his fingers, so he had to let go. The other three members stayed with the plane and belly-landed it in the shallow water about, a mile off the eastern side of the island. They were able to extinguish the fire in the number one oil tank.

            So there I was, all alone on this side of the island, lying in about six inches of water, not knowing if there were any Japanese on the island. Any movement of my leg hurt excruciatingly. Eventually, using my elbows, I was able to drag myself out of the water onto the beach and cropped my head against a coconut tree. We crew-members carried an Army Colt 45 semi automatic strapped to our belts. I pulled mine out of its’ holster and held it in my hand - if there were any Japs here I suppose I would have used it as long as I could. After a while I decided to fire three rounds into the air so that the others would know where to find me.

            A short time later, here they came around the Island, along with some Melanesian natives in a boat of some sort. They were certainly a welcome sight! They made me as comfortable as possible lying there on the beach. Actually, the rest of the crew seemed to be enjoying the experience, and I could have too had I been a little more mobile. We were not hurting for food or drink - that was still available in our plane, which sat half-sub merged about a mile out in the water. Lt. Swanson got the 12-gauge shot gun which we carried in the plane and shot some type of guinea fowl on the island, which he cooked over a fire on the beach.

            That night the mosquitoes almost ate me up - we had no mosquito nets to sleep under.

            [02-04-42] No one seemed overly concerned about how we were going to get back to our base - I suppose expecting the worst in combat, we just accepted things as they were at the particular moment. The other planes of our formation had seen us go down on the Island - we were sure they would have us picked up somehow. Sure enough, about noon the following day a Navy PBY flying boat circled the Island and landed a short, distance out in the lagoon near where our B-17 lay in the water. The PBY could not come in too close because of the shallow water; however, our crew members got me into a rubber life-raft and we made it out to the PBY, where I was gently lifted aboard by some good strong U.S. Navy hands.

Untimely End for our proud bird

            As we lifted off the water we passed over B-17E 12469. It's too bad we never gave her some exotic name. She was lying there so ignominiously, half in and half out of the water - we had flown half-way around the world in her, and she was a part of us.

            On several occasions recently, retired Col. Swanson has expressed a desire to get as many of the crew-members together as possible, getting a sailboat and sailing over to the South Seas to see if our B-17 was still lying there on that reef. I am sure that either the natives cut the plane up to make pots and pans out of it’s aluminum, or the Japanese salvaged the p lane when they occupied the islands. But, the Colonel's expressed desires, only a dream, are indicative of how close a plane and it’s crew can become. Today, four of our eight-man crew are still in contact with each other. We lost contact with Frumkin, Reynolds and Forte; George Sweeder died of a heart attack a couple of years ago, but forty-five years later, Ted Swanson, Earl Longacre, Leo Ferraguto, I and our lovely wives had a delightful time together in July of 1986, at the Boeing Aircraft Corporation's 50th anniversary of the B-17 aircraft in Seattle, Washington. We still hear from each other at least at Christmas time - although we may be on the glide slope for landing after life's flight, if we had it to do over again we would have it no other way - we would fly together as crew-members on B-17-E 12469.

Escape from Java

            When our rescue PBY landed at the Dutch naval base at Soerabaya, that was the last time I saw our crew as a whole. They bid me goodbye, and I was taken to the small Dutch hospital at the naval base, while they returned to Malang. They continued to fly together as a crew until forced to evacuate to Australia a few weeks later. Forte, Ferraguto and Sweeder stayed together as crew-members with the 19th Bomb Group, flying against the Japanese out of Australia and New Guinea until the following November, when they returned to the States. I ran into the three of them on two occasions, once while standing in the chow-line at Seven-Mile strip, Port Moresby, New Guinea; again, while standing in a chow-line at Mareeba, Queensland, Australia, where the 19th Bomb Group was operating out of at the time. The other crew members went their own separate ways.

            [02-10-42] When the Dutch doctor at the hospital looked me over he assumed that my knee was only dislocated - as far as I knew they had no X-ray facilities there - a few days in bed would take care of it. It was not until I arrived at a field hospital in Australia when an X-ray revealed that the spine of the tibia bone in my leg was fractured.

            So I lay there in the hospital cot, making the best of the situation. In the bed next to me was a Dutch marine, Jan Hage. He was about my age, and we became good friends. We had a great time teaching each other our respective languages - he tried to teach me a few words in Dutch or Malay, while I reciprocated in English.

            Our favorite nurse was July - she was blond, well built, and, as far as I was concerned. an angel! She could not speak English, but between her, Jan and me, we got along just fine. I'll never forget the time I called her "mien liefling" - Dutch for "my darling". Was she surprised, and shocked! Jan almost ruptured a blood vessel laughing - but she liked it. Later, she asked me to go out- to dinner with her; however, the tides of war did not permit it. I have often wondered what Jan and July had to go through when the Japs overran the Island of Java.

            A couple days after my arrival at the hospital we had a bomb alert - a large formation of Jap Betty bombers were heading for Soerabaja. July, the nurse, was scurrying around, trying to get patients under mattresses for protection. I could not get out of bed yet, so I had no choice but to lie there. When we could hear the irregular throb of the bomber’s engines, and the Dutch anti-aircraft guns begin to fire at them, we knew they were close. July and the others were able to get under the hospital cots - strangely, I was not afraid - I knew that I wasn't going to get hit. The Japs dropped their bombs on the base - none hit the hospital but a Javanese just outside the hospital door was hit in the throat by a piece of shrapnel. I kept a piece of shrapnel for a souvenir; however, it, along with my good-luck bracelet, was stolen from me in the hospital by one of the Javanese cleaning personnel.

            After a few days my leg felt pretty good - the knee joint was stiff, but I could hobble around on it pretty well. I was getting a little concerned - the Japanese were invading the Island; although they did not bomb the hospital again, on several occasions I was able to see formations of their bombers flying overhead. In the beginning, the small Dutch Air Force and a few of our P-40s opposed them, but were soon overwhelmed. Except for one of our P-40 pilots who was shot down and badly burned on the first Jap raid on the hospital - he died during the night - I believe I was the only American in the hospital. No one of our military forces had contacted me. So I decided to take things into my own hands.

            First of all, I had no shoes! All I had as far as personal belongings was my light flying coveralls - I had been jerked out of my flying boots when my parachute opened. I had no headgear. I did have a few Dutch guilders, so one morning I got a taxicab to the down town area and bought a pair of low-cut civilian shoes. They were the largest I could find, but far too small for comfort; however, they had to do in a pinch. I also bought a pith sun-helmet.

            [02-25-52] The next day, on my own initiative, I left the hospital, made my way to the down-town area; here I found one of our GI trucks which was headed for our air base at Malang. When I got back to the base, I learned that all of the air crews had evacuated the base. The only Americans left were the ground crews, and they were leaving that evening by train. I could not find any of my personal belongings, my clothes, camera, etc - all I had was what I was wearing at the time - my flight coveralls, pith helmet, and tight low-cut civilian shoes. However, had I left the hospital a day later, I would have been left behind - I don't think I would be writing this account today.

            That evening all the American personnel left at the Malang air base boarded a train at the local train station. We would travel by night, since the Japanese air force was active during the daytime, strafing targets at low altitude. We traveled on the train all night - we were headed for the port of Tjilatjap, on the southern coast of Java, from where we were to be evacuated by ship. After about a 200-mile ride on the antiquated train the following afternoon we arrived at the port.

            The port was a hub-bub of activity - the situation with the Japanese was rapidly deteriorating. Our meager naval forces, along with a few elements of the Royal Dutch Navy, were battling it out with the superior Japanese naval forces in the Java Sea. The Japanese had already captured Singapore on the Malay peninsula to the north; a few hundred English and Australian soldiers had been able to make their escape to Java, and were now here at the port boarding whatever they could to escape to Australia.

            We were in the same boat, literally. That afternoon we Americans, along with a rag-tag bunch of English and Australian troops, boarded a Dutch freighter, the Abbekerk.

            Late that afternoon, at high tide, we sailed out of the port. There were quite a number of ships of all sizes leaving the port at the time. They were going to proceed together by convoy to Australia. However, the captain of our ship, the Abbekerk, was a hard-headed Dutchman; he decided to go it alone. His ship had a top speed of 22 knots, while the convoy would have to travel at a much slower speed. Again, it seems the Good Lord was looking out for us - that convoy was intercepted by units of the Japanese navy, and all of those ships were sunk.

            Three to four hours after we had left the port, just before sunset, we were approached by a single low-flying plane. As it flew close by at a low altitude, presumably to look us over, we could plainly see the red circle of the rising sun of Japan -- the plane was a Japanese reconnaissance plane. Except for a single 4-incher mounted near the bridge of the ship, the Abbekerk was unarmed. Some of our old-time sergeants had obtained a single aircraft 50-caliber machine gun and mounted it on the top-deck - it had no grips to hold and aim it with, so they held and aimed it with a couple pairs of pliers.

            The Japanese plane circled back toward us and made a low-level attack on our ship. It dropped two bombs which missed the ship. The ships four incher was firing away at the plane, while a couple of our troops stood out on the open deck manning the 50-caliber machine gun. As the plane made another pass I was out on the top deck, trying to hide behind whatever I could find - this time I'll have to admit I was scared!

            After that second pass the Jap plane headed away from us and disappeared. I don't know whether our anti-aircraft fire had discouraged him or whatever; I was sure he was going to bring back the whole Japanese navy to sink us. In fact, I was ready to accept it - I had made my peace with the Lord. I had found an empty wine bottle which I filled with water - I tied it to my belt with a rope - I figured I would need it in the ocean.

            After dark that evening we had a big tropical moon - under different circumstances I would have called it beautiful - however, at the time a few storm clouds certainly would have helped -- the ocean was as bright as day, and we were so visible! But the Japanese did not return; no doubt they were too busy with the convoy we had left behind.

            As we headed southward at 22 knots toward Australia, the following day we began to feel a little more secure. The Abbekerk was not a passenger or troop ship - it was a cargo freighter, and had no accommodations for it’s human cargo. Most of the troops aboard slept out on the open top-deck. Field kitchens had been set up on deck, where we were fed field rations twice a day. I didn't feel much like eating that first day, with a slight case of mal de mer. I had to make one dash for the ships rail, and quickly learned that one must go to the leeward side of the ship to toss ones cookies overboard.

            Those shoes I had bought in Soerabaja were bothering my feet, so I had removed them and had laid them down on the deck. One of the English or Aussie troops came along and swiped them - I hope they fit him better than they had fit me. I later found a pair of flying boots down in the hold of the ship, which I appropriated and wore from then on.  (Adamczyk continued)

Del Monte Mindanao to Java to Broome Australia by  H. McAuliff Navigator

Mid Jan 1942 Del Monte Fld Mindanao

While at Cagayan Mindanao we witnessed a wild fracas between a P-40 and a Zero – all around the sky with the Zero on the P-40's tail.  Finally, the P-40 pilot put it down in the shallow water near the shore and was able to wade ashore unharmed.

A lot of the 30th Squadron ground crews, including the mess sergeant and a field kitchen, were on that little steamer and they set up camp on a bluff overlooking the bay.  I really don't remember what we'd been getting for meals up to this point, but the mess sergeant's [Robinett] chow was a vast improvement.  While all of this was good news, there was a dark side also.

Major Gibbs was shot down flying a B-18 from Clark to Del Monte.  He was a fine officer and an outstanding Squadron Commander and was sorely missed.

Back at Del Monte a few days later, I was detailed to clear an emergency landing strip for P-40's.  There were still a few of these flying around, but mostly as couriers.  There were about 20 men armed with picks and shovels and we climbed into a truck and headed out several miles to what had once been a cane field.  We were fairly well under way when a jeep drove up and the sergeant driving it said, "Lieutenant, you're wanted back at the field." So, I left the senior noncom in charge and left.  There was a B-17 on the field and I was told, "Get your gear and get aboard, you're going out." There were others on board and I somehow wound up standing in the cockpit behind the pilot and co-pilot.

The reason for this flight, aside from picking up strays and taking them to Java, was to bomb Japanese ships reported to be concentrated south of Zamboanga on the extreme southwest corner of Mindanao.  We made the bomb run at 20,000 feet I couldn't see the results from where I was standing, but the problem was that the bomb bay doors wouldn't close.  This slows down the airspeed which is very bad news if there are fighters around.  Since I had no particular duties and was closest to the bay, I was given the task of cranking the doors closed by hand.

This is a bear of an operation, as you have to straddle the catwalk and reach far down to the right to operate the crank.  The mechanism seemed stiff and was hard to turn.  The big problem was the lack of oxygen.  The hose from the flight deck was too short for me to be able to use it while cranking, and after four or five turns I had to sit upright and lean forward to get a few gulps and then resume cranking again.  The prospect of getting dizzy and failing through 20,000 ft. into the Sulu Sea was not an inviting one.  Finally the job was done and we were clear of the target area, so we started a descent to a more comfortable altitude.

Malang Java

My first impression of Java was that it was beautiful.  We came in over Surabaya a Dutch port and naval base, with the town spread out behind it.  Everything looked neat and clean, a refreshing sight after the Philippines.  We flew inland a few miles to a Dutch Air Force base outside the town of Malang.  We were assigned to the Dutch Officers!  Quarters - a long step up the civilization ladder from what we'd been used to.  There weren't many Dutch flying officers around anymore.  The ancient B-10’s and their crews had been used up.  They were a gutsy bunch and had made low-level attacks on the Japanese fleet as long as they lasted.

Jan 22; A day or two after landing in Java, I flew my first combat mission.  I looked forward to it, as I was sick and tired of taking this punishment on the ground.  I wanted revenge.  It didn't exactly turn out this way.  This mission was to bomb the Japanese fleet which was strung out between Borneo and Celebes and its size was impressive -- there were battleships, carriers, cruisers, cargo ships, destroyers -- the whole works.  As we reached the bomb release line, all hell broke loose.  The anti-aircraft was intense and swarms of fighters attacked.  The bombs were dropped, but I had no idea where they went -- I was completely dazed and terrified by the ferocity of the attack.  The Zeros were coming in from astern and as one completed his pass, he was just off our right wing when he exploded in a million pieces.  I guess our side gunner got him.  It's weird, but my impression at the time was that of a turkey exploding in mid-air in a cloud of feathers and the bombardier sifting scrunched down in his armor-backed seat with only the top of his WW I tin hat showing.  We pulled clear of this with some bullet holes in the airplane but no casualties and landed back at Malang.

At the time, it seemed impossible that anyone could get used to this terrifying kind of uproar, but in time I did and even became slightly blase about it - I think we all did.  The moments of terror were still there, but it seemed like we weren't going to get out of this mess anyway, so why sweat it?  The phrase, "What the hell, you want to live forever?," became a popular one.

The next two or three missions I flew were about like the first, since they were against the Japanese fleet which was in about the same place.  From 25,000 feet we could see the ships turn as the bombs left the bomb bay and the best that I ever saw were some near misses and a hit on the stem of one ship.  The ack-ack was intense and the Zeros aggressive.

            Feb On one occasion when were in an old D model without tail gun or turrets, we had a Zero on our tail.  So the pilot (Swanbeck) went up and over a B-17E off our right and down under it -- whatever it took to keep the E's tail gun between us and the Zero. As time went on, it was obvious that we weren't doing much damage to moving ships, but we were thinning out the ranks of the Zeros considerably.

As the lead navigator of a formation of six B-17 E aircraft, I had set the course from the Dutch airfield at Malang eastward along the south coast of Java toward the Straits of Bali.  It was February 17, 1942, and we were after a Japanese carrier reported to be close inshore to the island of Bali.

On turning north up the strait, we had to drop down to 12,000 feet to get under a heavy overcast.  Within minutes we sighted the carrier.  We were dead on target and it looked like a perfect run for the bombardier.  As he got the bombsight lined up, I watched the carrier and could see fighters leaving the deck.

In a matter of minutes, six Zero fighters were at our altitude and coming straight for us in a head-on attack.  I could see the leader open fire, but there seemed to be no return fire from our formation.  There was a .30 caliber machine-gun in the compartment and I grabbed it and thrust it through the metal gunport in the Plexiglas nose.  I knew that it was no match for the 20 millimeter cannon of the fighters and not nearly the range.  But the rate of closure must have been close to 500 mph, so I did the only thing I could, filling the space through which the Zero had to fly with all the fire I could.  I thought I must have hit some part of him, as he quit firing and went into a shallow dive along with his entire flight beneath our formation.  I could hear our rear guns firing while we headed for cloud cover.

I learned later that the twin .50 caliber turret guns had malfunctioned, as was the case with three other airplanes in our formation, so the little .30 caliber gun I was firing played a more important part in the battle than I'd expected.  When I got off the gun, I saw that the bombardier had removed the bombsight from its mount and realized that the bombs had not released and that we were heading for cloud cover lugging several tons of dead weight.  Why this happened, I don't know - possibly the gun firing directly over his head and hot empty shell casings flying around might have distracted him.

Far more important than this was why the turrets had malfunctioned.  These new E type B-17s had been flown hurriedly over the Atlantic, across Africa and India. to give us some replacements in Java.  The crews probably had not had time to become thoroughly checked out on them -- and we had had little or none.  These guns were a fairly sophisticated piece of equipment with electric optical sights, so the maintenance had to be done carefully.  The upshot of all this was that a factory representative was flown out to give our people the necessary instruction and training.

Months after this fiasco was over and done with, I learned that I had been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action and being instrumental in breaking up the enemy attack.  The citation went on to say, "One Zero was shot down."

There was one night mission that was kind of a hair-raiser.  It wasn’t danger from the enemy this time, but from the weather.  It was as black as I'd ever seen it and we were following the airplane in front of us.  All you could see was the dim red light on his tail and we were trying not to lose him or overrun him all the way up to Macasar.  The Dutch wanted us to bomb their oil fields there so that the Japanese couldn’t use them.  There were fires in one area which the first of our flight had started, so we unloaded in the same place.  Down below, there were flashes of what looked like sheet lightning but may have been naval gunfire.

We finally got out of there without colliding with another airplane and got into calmer weather and landed back in Malang.

The dining arrangements at Malang were unique to say the least.  Each evening we boarded a bus at the airfield and went into town.  It was a paved road weaving its way through trees and past scenic terraced rice paddies.  The bus would stop every so often to let a large group of monkeys cross the road.  I noticed a huge black python entwined in the lower branches on one of the trees - waiting, no doubt, to drop down on some unwary monkey.

The bus took us to the Palace Hotel, a very plush affair in the middle of beautiful, well-kept grounds.  Once inside, we trooped into the dining room, which was really a large banquet hall with two long tables running down the length of the room from either end of the head table.  Col. Eubank, the Group C.O., sat at the head table with some of his staff and some high-ranking Dutch officers.  The tables had large bowls piled high with exotic looking fruit of all shapes and colors.  Behind the diners, waiters stood in turbans and bright costumes ready to serve the next course.  It was a far cry from life in the "gully" at Del Monte.  The routine here was that a sheet of paper from the head table was passed down the line from hand to hand containing only a list of names.  If your name was on it, you flew the next morning and boarded the bus back to the field after dinner.  If you were not on the list, you had the evening off.

On one such free evening, I ran into some American submarine officers.  They had heard that it was possible to get a phone call through from the Malang telephone office to the United States, so I went with them.  I don't know how the Navy always seemed to get the word about this sort of thing and we didn't.  It proved to be surprisingly easy.  I gave the girl at the desk the number, city, and who I wished to speak to and was directed to one of the several phone booths in the office.  I'd expected some kind of restriction or censorship, but there was none of that, and presently I heard Marjorie answer the phone.  She gave a yelp when she recognized my voice and I was able to tell her I was in Java and still all in one piece.  She hadn't heard anything since the war started and didn't know if I was dead or alive.  It was a thrill to hear her voice and it boosted her morale.  This was a tough time for the wives and families of Army personnel in the Philippines, as there was no means of communicating.

Things kept grinding away in Java.  I was flying about every other day.  The 7th Group were equipped withB-17Es and had flown them to Java over the Atlantic-Africa-India route and we inherited some of them, to replace our worn down D models.  The airfield at Malang was attacked and strafed several times.  On one such raid a B-17 near the hangar was set afire and exploded.  Pieces of it flew in all directions.  The force of the explosion was so great that one inch steel armor plate sailed over the hangar roof, crumpled like a piece of tinfoil.

We continued to pound away at the Japanese fleet with the usual results - more Zeros shot down than ships damaged.  On one really bad day, the Jap fighters were waiting for us just as we cleared the coast of Java with full bomb loads at about 8,000 feet, climbing slowly to our bombing altitude.  The plane next to ours in the formation was hit and caught fire.  It continued to burn and crashed into the sea.

Sometimes a mission starts out wrong and stays that way from beginning to end.  We had a newly arrived Major from the 7th Group leading this one.  He had instructed all planes to check in with him on the radio prior to take-off.  Someone failed to do so and the Major got out of the lead ship, strode out where he could be seen by all and stood, arms akimbo, glaring at the offending party.  They finally got the word and he went back to his airplane.  Those of us who had been through strafing raids are sweating heavily while this went on.  Eight airplanes, engines idling, with full bomb loads, fuel, and crews, would have been a prize target for a lone Zero patrolling the early morning sky, and he could have wiped us out with one pass.

The final faux pas took place as we sighted the Japanese fleet from 25,000 ft.  Our leader ordered the formation broken up -- each airplane to select a ship for an individual attack.  This is asking for it when fighters are around -- and they were -- as you lose the protection of concentrated fire that a formation can unleash.  There was ack-ack and we took a hit on the right wing.  As we withdrew, we saw the leaders plane go into a shallow dive which became steeper and kept on going until it splashed into the sea.  There was no radio message, just silence, so we never did know what happened.

This was tragic, as he was well liked and respected by those who knew him in the 7th Group.  The 19th had learned something about combat flying the hard way too, and it was a costly business.  Our own troubles were just starting.  The hole in our wing was not large, but the ack-ack had blown out the tire on the right landing gear and I wondered how Schwanbeck was going to handle this one.  He did a pretty slick job of keeping the left wheel on the ground with the flat tire on the right just skimming the grass, and then ground looping it when we'd lost enough speed -- with no damage to the airplane.

The over-all command structure at this stage of the war was sort of a nightmare made up of British, Australian, Dutch and American troops, all under the command of a Dutch Admiral who couldn't speak English.  This meant that a bilingual officer had to be on the bridge of the non-Dutch ships to explain the Admiral's orders, which probably explained why some of the naval action got screwed up.  This was the same body, I think, that selected our targets.  If so, the British must have prevailed at the last session, as our next mission was to Singapore.

We never got there.  Shortly after leaving the western end of Java we ran into some weather which grew steadily worse as we continued on, and finally got so violent that we had to turn back.  Over Java once more, we received Malang's radio message that the field was under attack and to stay away until the "all clear” was given.  So, round and round we flew over the west end of Java with the ceiling getting lower all the while and winding up at about 1,000 feet to stay under it before we were able to head for home.

The operation in Java was winding down faster than I knew.  On one of the “free" evenings.  I was sifting around a plush planters club with some fellow officers and some Dutch civilians including some "white" Russians who had escaped the revolution of 1918 and the conflicts and wars that followed between the Whites and the Reds.  The Dutch had allowed them to settle in Java but they were technically stateless persons and none of them, Dutch or Russian, were under any illusions as to the treatment they'd get at the hands of the Japanese when they occupied the country.

Presently, a bus arrived -- much earlier than usual - and a lot of the group left.  A few minutes later, I realized that they ALL had left. I still thought there would be another bus - there usually was.  Instead, about 15 minutes later a blonde young woman in a Dutch Army uniform came sailing into the room and said, "if you are Lt.  McAuliff, come with me -- and hurry!".

Outside was a motorcycle with a side car which I piled into and she took off like a scared rabbit.  We sailed down the road - she sure could drive that thing - and out on to the field to a B-17 with all four props turning.  The door opened and several pairs of hands yanked me inside and the airplane started its take-off roll.  Inside, sifting on the floor, were all the guys who had left on the bus - a glum-looking lot.  I think we all felt really bad at having to leave the Dutch to go it alone, but there was little more that we could do except get our airplanes blown up on the field.  There had been enough of that at Clark.  Many times since, I've wondered what happened to that Dutch girl, hoping that somehow she made it out of there.  I didn't even have a chance to thank her.

We landed at Broome on the west coast of Australia in the morning.  The Japanese had worked the place over, causing a lot of damage.  A row of PBYs anchored near the shore had been strafed and sunk, the hangar had been hit, and there was debris scattered about the field.  There was also a large mob of people milling around trying to get sorted out under confusing and conflicting directions.

A B-24 taxied in from the runway and we went over to see what that was all about.  It turned out to be Ben Funk whom I had known at March Field, who was the pilot.  He loaded as many as he could on the airplane - including a very pregnant Dutch woman - and we headed for Perth, 1000 miles to the south.  I never dreamed that a B-24 could be so crammed full of people, and, to a man, we were all praying that the Dutch woman could hold out until we reached Perth.

This was the end of our air travel (the Dutch lady made it, thank God), and we were put on a troop train headed east across the Great Australian Desert for Melbourne.  The Australian troops seemed young and noisy, very friendly, and curious about us.  The cars were old wooden antiques from a by-gone age and as it was extremely hot, all the windows were open and flies, dust, and smoke from the steam locomotive came inside.

The trip took four days and we slept sitting up -- when we could.  I don't recall eating anything other than sandwiches provided by some volunteer ladies when the train stopped briefly at small little settlements along the way.  Doug Keller and I had invested in a couple bottles of Scotch before leaving Perth and we kept a poker game going to ward off the boredom of the trip.   (McAuliff continued)

The Java Experience by Ed Teats Pilot cont.

             Early in February, the Nips came over on a strafing party while I was absent on a ferrying mission to Australia. It is one personal gripe I want to settle some time with the Japs.

            A few days earlier, Jim Connally told me that he wanted me to fly a plane out to Australia for overhaul. I was hoping that it would be mine. The engines were worn out, for they had 500 hours on them without major overhaul, but the plane itself was in perfect condition. It barely had a scratch on it. When I found out that I was to take out an old, battered wreck, one that was all shot up, I was griped.

            It had no hydraulic system. Three of the engines seemed to be running okay aside from a slight roughness, but the fourth had been hit, and a 37 mm anti-aircraft shell had hit and weakened one of the wings. It had to be flown with one wing about 10 degrees below the other, so that it just crabbed and sobbed along at low altitude and low speed. We made the flight out to Australia in seven hours, the last two and a half hours on three engines.

            The following day an engine failed at a critical time of the take-off, when we could neither get off the ground on three engines, due to the heavy gas load, nor ground-loop because we had no effective brakes. In the few seconds available, we did every thing possible to avoid a crack-up, but the plane was demolished.

            One of my best friends and one of the Army's best navigator, Lt "Mac" McAllister, was fatally injured.

            I got back to Malang on the 7th to discover that the day before the Japs had strafed the field. Two planes, fully loaded with gas and bombs, were caught on the runway and blew up. My old "78" was burned in a bunker (dispersal bay).

            All that remained of it was a charred carcass on the bunker, and an area of burned grass. My feeling wasn't one solely of sentimental regret at losing a plane whose capacity and idiosyncrasies I knew as familiarly as I knew the back of my hand. That was part of it, but my main gripe was that it was a good plane, one badly needed in operations and it was gone.

            The long shadow cast by the little men of Nippon was stretching across Java.

            Singapore fell on February 15.

            It was the key to the defense of .the Netherlands & Indies, and the doom of Java was sealed..

            As far as we were concerned, Java rapidly was becoming untenable. The Japs were in position where they could hit our bases at will. Early in February, they were getting in close.

            They poured down through Macasar and Malacca straits, gobbled Borneo and Macassar and started to hammer at the mass of islands forming the Indies' east flank. Palembang fell on Feb. 16, after a savage defense by the Dutch, who wiped out one entire force of Jap parachute troops two days earlier. Darwin was bombed for the first time on Feb. 19, and the next day, the little men invaded Bali and Timor.

            The 19th group had participated with sea forces in smashing at the big enemy invasion convoy which came down through Macassar strait in January. We had the force only to hurt them-not to halt them.

            We were to busy and too fagged then to see the drama of the whole show. All we grasped was that for the second time in less than three months, a delaying action would have to be broken off by withdrawal in the face of overwhelming enemy offensive superiority.

            On February 24, our first plane-load of group personnel who were not available for combat duty went south to Broome, Australia. The following day, two of us flew out a group of personnel not available for or requisite to combat operations and put them down at Broome, roughly 900 miles in an air line southeast of Malang.

            The pressure was on. We left Malang at 9 o'clock in the morning, got into Broome at 8, gassed up and flew north at noon, and got in at Malang at 6.30 P.M., and we made the entire trip with one bad engine, and 5 1/2 of the 6 1/2 hours of the return flight on three  engines.

            The night of the 26th, more personnel were evacuated by air.

            The following day the four ships which I mentioned yesterday took off at 6 o'clock in the morning to look for the big Jap convoy coming down from Indo-China and which we anticipated to land invasion forced somewhere on the north coast of Java between Surabava and Semarang.

            Unable to complete the mission due to trouble with our almost worn out engines and ordered not to return to Malang because it was under almost constant attack; Capt. Fred Key, Dean “Pinky" Hoevet and I landed at Djodjakarta, an air base a few miles inland from the south central coast of the island approximately 150 miles southwest of Malang.

            It was out of the frying pan in to the fire, for the field at Djodjakarta was expecting a raid any time. The operations officer told us that a yellow flag was flown for the alert, but that when a black ball was run up on the mast of the control tower, it meant that enemy planes had been sighted. We stood by our planes at the end of the runway. when the yellow flag went up, we started our engines, and the black ball was still rising toward the mast-head when we roared past, on our way. We had no intention of playing fish in a barrel to Jap strafers.

            The alert happened to be a fake although we didn’t learn that until we returned. We knew that we had an hour or so to kill so we loafed down along the south coast sticking close to the clouds, ready to duck for cover if any Nips showed up.

            On our way back, we spotted a large formation of enemy planes far above us off toward the west through the low scud clouds. We sat down almost on the wave caps in an effort to avoid detection and sometime later we saw them head back east.

            The first word we received on landing at Djodjakarta was that the United States sea plane tender Langley had been bombed and, later, that she had been sunk. We had no doubt whatever that this big formation which we had seen and evaded was that which bombed the Langley and we estimated that had we flown 50 miles east we would have seen her.

            (The Navy Department announced on April 3 in Communiqué 65 that the Langley, an old 11,000-ton seaplane tender and the United States first aircraft carrier, “was sunk after prolonged attack by the enemy south of Java in late February.” The same communiqué disclosed that most of the personnel was rescued by the tanker Pecos, which itself was sunk in enemy action a few days later. J.M,M)

            We were able to grab about three hours’ sleep before taking off for Broome with a load of personnel. The crew worked all of the rest of that day on the ship, and at noon on March 1, Ed Green, who was Maj O’Donnell’s co-pilot on their famous flight out of the Philippines in the hand fueled B-18, and I started back for Djodjakarta.

            We flew together all the way up. The visibility was poor. A lot of stuff was socked down all over the mountains and we had difficulty finding the proper spot along the coast to turn in. Ed had lowered his wheels for identification purposed and was turning inland to approach the field and I was preparing to follow him when my tail gunner reported a strange two engined plane promptly increase it’s speed. We chased it for ten minutes before getting slightly above it and closed enough to be in favorable position to attack. With all guns manned, we closed to within 500 yards before we could see RAF markings on the vertical tail surface.

            We had no means of communications, of course, since we didn’t know what radio frequency the plane might be using, but he hadn’t altered course or made a false move -- and the Royal Air Force markings seemed to settle the matter. Satisfied, we turned and flew back to our base and reported about the incident to the Dutch operations officer. He smiled grimly.

            “Oh yes,” he said, “effective ... lets see ... just three hours ago; two types of British planes are to be considered hostile.”

            The plane we had overtaken was one of the types. The Japs caught some planes on the ground at Singapore and Palembang which it had been impossible to demolish or evacuate. They promptly fixed them up and used them for reconnaissance. It was beautiful irony that for some reason we had been in position to blast that Jap crew into the ocean, or some place hotter than their own rising Sun -- and didn't.

            We had to use all of our persuasion that night on the Dutch. They wanted to blow one of the runways, leaving only the other open. We were afraid that the debris tossed up by the demolition would riddle our planes, which were scheduled to leave just before midnight with the last of our remaining personnel. When we were forced to leave Malang the previous day because it had become untenable under constant attack, a clean-up crew of our men demolished all of our property which could not be taken out or repaired. Some of the 7th Group boys had been drifting in all that day from Madiun. They had had the Hell bombed out of them that day and the day before, and Madiun also was untenable.

            We managed to persuade the Dutch to hold up their demolition until we took off, and ad 10:45 o'clock on the night of March 1, we took off for Broome. At that time our planes were in such bad condition that a maximum safe load of 30 personnel to each one had been established. That was the maximum load we were supposed to carry because the flight from Djodjakarta to Broome is entirely over water, and if we were forced down by an impossible overload, we would be out of luck, having no extra rafts and few life vests.

            At the last minute, twenty fellows showed up, most of them American pursuit pilots who had been shot down and had been beating their way out through the bush. -With the two planes Ed Greene and I flew up from Broome that day we had seven planes on which to load all remaining personnel and they were full.

            Captain "Shady" Lane, a fighter squadron commander and a class mate of mine at Randolph and Kelly fields, who was to ride with me, asked me if I could take any extras. I explained the situation to him but told him that if any of them wanted to risk it, we would gamble. We took five of them, and sent the others over to Greene, who took five more. The other ten climbed aboard some of the other planes, for I saw them at Broome later.

Broome Australia

            My plane, loaded to the guards, hit Broome just at sunrise, refueled immediately, and went on through to Perth on the Southwest coast of Australia, 7 1/2 hours and 900 miles in a direct air-line farther south.

            Out of the preceding 60 hours, we had spent 40 of them in the air without sleep. The whole crew did that. It corresponds to the job the fellows did at Midway, when they flew 40 continuous hours of combat. The five planes which joined Greene and I that evening at Djodjakarta, landed there from the last bombing mission U.S. planes conducted in Java.

            Every flyable plane we had was in action up to the last minute, either bombing in a desperate last minute effort to hold off the Nips until evacuation was completed, or until the planes were unfit for bombing use. On the morning of the day we left Djodjakarta, a strafing raid on the field damaged two "Liberators" so badly that they had to be destroyed that night to prevent their use by the Japs.

            It had been our intention to fly from Perth straight through to Melbourne, a distance of 1800 to 2000 miles, and we came out on the field in the morning with that thought in mind. Just as we were making preparation for our take-off, Major Hobson, who was there with 5 or 6 planes of the 7th Group, and who was acting as commander of our detail of gypsies, received an urgent message from Broome. It directed all available planes to stand by for immediate evacuation of "surviving" refugees from that port.

            Broome is just a little fishing port, much used by Japanese pearl fishermen before the war, situated almost on the edge of the great Sandy Desert of central west Australia.

            There are only two ways of getting out of it, other than by walking -- by water or air. It is one of the most desolate places I have ever seen.

            The message concerning evacuation of "surviving" refugees was puzzling at first, but not for long. The day before -- March 3 -- the Japs had strafed it unmercifully.

            We abandoned all plans for flying east, ripped out our one bomb tank and replaced it with baggage racks, and took off once again for Broome.

            The day before, the civilian evacuation or Java had been, at its height: Sunderland flying boats, Australian and Dutch Catalinas -- literally everything that would. fly -- were concentrated there. The Dutch were flying civilian evacuees, principally women and children, out of Java, and the Aussies were picking them up at Broome and flying them on south.

            These evacuees -- wretched folk who had left their homeland, and many of them their heroic loved ones, with hardly more than the clothes on their backs jammed the air field, waiting for land plane transportation. There were some on the beach. Still others were  either in small boats or already had boarded the flying boats.

            Then the Zeros came in -- off carriers, we assumed. There was practically no protection. About 16 flying boats were caught on the water and riddled. One of our ships-either an LB-30 or a B-24, but in any event one or the North American Liberator type --was just taking off with 24 people on board, but had not gained altitude. So far as we were able to learn, the sole survivor of that plane was a sergeant who was in the water 24 hours and who came staggering up on the beach while we were there, clad only in shorts. We took him out with us that night, wrapped in blankets to present illness from long exposure and shock.

            The place was a shambles. It was no place to tarry. As rapidly as we could, we rounded up our complement, loaded the baggage racks, refueled and at 11:15 took off for the last time from the grim port of Broome.

March 7 Melbourne Australia

            We flew directly through from Perth to Adelalde the following day over country no member of the crew ever had seen before and finally put down at Melbourne on the 7th of March.

            Just two planes of the original group that had been based at Clark Field survived to make Australia. One was a B-17C, which still is being used as a ferry plane for the transport of freight and personnel. The other is the justly famous B-17D, known to the American public as “Alexander the Swoose" -- the plane which Lt General George H. Brett used as his personal plane in directing the Allied air forces in the Australian theater, and in which he flew back to the United States. It was the same plane which had been flown out to the Philippines from Hawaii by Lt Weldon Smith, and from Del Monte to Australia to Malang.